SODA SPRINGS, Idaho (AP) -- The company behind a proposed phosphate mine in eastern Idaho plans to invest an additional $10 million into the project to address environmental concerns raised during a public comment period.

Monsanto Co.'s proposed mine is slated to produce ingredients for Roundup weedkiller and has generated nearly 7,000 public comments, including from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which wants additional pollution safeguards.

The Bureau of Land Management will review the comments to determine if a plan for the Blackfoot Bridge Mine released earlier this year merits any changes.

The $10 million in design improvements will be included in the final mining plan, which will be available for a 30-day comment period after its release.

A former U.S. Interior secretary was among those who voiced support for the proposal during a public comment period earlier this year. But the EPA has raised concerns about possible failure of a proposed $25 million liner meant to stop naturally occurring but poisonous selenium before it reaches the Blackfoot River.

A former U.S. Interior secretary was among those who voiced support for the proposal during a public comment period earlier this year. But the EPA has raised concerns about possible failure of a proposed $25 million liner meant to stop naturally occurring but poisonous selenium before it reaches the Blackfoot River.

The BLM determined in August that the Blackfoot Bridge plan, including the liner to be installed over selenium-rich waste rock, would be sufficient.

The EPA commented that it was highly likely that additional measures may be necessary. The agency is already pushing Monsanto to resolve Clean Water Act violations at the mine that Blackfoot Bridge is due to replace next year.

Marv Hoyt, an Idaho Falls director of the environmental group Greater Yellowstone Coalition, said he had similar concerns over the proposal. He said he plans to review the final mining plan with Monsanto officials in about a month.

"They may have addressed our concerns, or they may not have," Hoyt told the Idaho State Journal. "We're hopeful that they've done the right thing and there won't be any more selenium poisoning in the Blackfoot basin."

Final approval of the mine could come by next summer.

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