Capital Press | Nation/World http://www.capitalpress.com Capital Press Wed, 22 Oct 2014 05:12:41 -0400 en http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/staticimage/images/rss-logo.jpg Capital Press | Nation/World http://www.capitalpress.com Idaho dry bean industry sets sights on Costa Rica http://www.capitalpress.com/Idaho/20141021/idaho-dry-bean-industry-sets-sights-on-costa-rica http://www.capitalpress.com/Idaho/20141021/idaho-dry-bean-industry-sets-sights-on-costa-rica#Comments Tue, 21 Oct 2014 14:26:44 -0400 Sean Ellis http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029952 BOISE ­— The Idaho Bean Commission will use an $18,000 specialty crop grant to try to help the state’s dry bean industry make inroads into Costa Rica.

The Central American nation of 4.6 million people is one of the Idaho industry’s most promising markets, said IBC member Don Tolmie.

“That Costa Rica project probably has as much potential to increase our exports of dry bean seed as anything we’ve ever attempted,” said Tolmie, production manager for Treasure Valley Seed Co.

Idaho has a strict testing program that certifies bean seed grown in the state is disease-free and is the leading bean seed supplier in the nation.

Costa Rican farmers grow a lot of dry beans but that crop faces significant disease pressure there, an issue Idaho can help solve.

“They need a shot in the arm,” Tolmie said. “A good crop of dry beans begins with good seed.”

During a trade mission in February, Tolmie and fellow IBC member John Dean met with representatives of Walmart in Costa Rica and a company that supplies them with red and black beans.

Both companies are interested in certified Idaho seed, Tolmie said, and the project will help Idaho nurture a relationship with them.

The grant, supplied by the Idaho State Department of Agriculture, will allow the commission to take preferred local varieties in Costa Rica that face substantial disease pressure and grown them in a disease-free environment in Idaho.

After that seed is certified, it will be grown in trial plots in Costa Rica so growers there can see first-had the benefits of using certified Idaho seed, said IBC Administrator Andi Woolf.

She said the project could pay off big for Idaho’s dry bean industry. “Costa Rica is a very promising market for us.”

The quality issues Costa Rican bean farmers face are serious and they are clamoring for an answer, Tolmie said.

But he also said growers there don’t fully grasp how complex the process of certifying bean seed is and Idaho’s industry needs to prove to them the value of investing in certified seed.

“They’re begging for clean seed but they don’t understand how complex clean seed is,” he said. “We’re going to have to help educate these folks about that process.”

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Yellow spud varieties make debut http://www.capitalpress.com/Idaho/20141021/yellow-spud-varieties-make-debut http://www.capitalpress.com/Idaho/20141021/yellow-spud-varieties-make-debut#Comments Tue, 21 Oct 2014 12:56:17 -0400 John O’Connell http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029953 IDAHO FALLS, Idaho — Yellow is becoming the new gold standard for specialty potato varieties, Northwestern spud industry experts say.

At the Produce Marketing Association’s Fresh Summit Convention from Oct. 17-19 in Anaheim, Calif., where produce companies go to show off their latest innovations, Idaho Falls-based Potandon Produce unveiled two new yellow potato varieties.

“We have seen explosive growth in the yellow potato subcategory in our whole potato group,” said Ralph Schwartz, Potandon’s vice president of marketing sales and innovation.

In recent years, Schwartz said yellow potatoes have represented about half of the variety development efforts of Potandon’s breeding division, SunRain Potato Varieties.

Schwartz said double-digit growth gains by the yellow category have led Potandon to believe that consumer preferences are shifting. Yellows still remain a small percentage of the overall potato crop, representing just 2 percent of Idaho’s 2014 fall potato acres and 3 percent of fall acreage in Oregon and Washington.

“We felt our greatest propensity for success was to ramp up the ones that are yellow potatoes,” Schwartz said.

Klondike Royale is high-yielding with yellow flesh and yellow skin bearing purple “kiss” marks. The packaging features purple fairies kissing the potato. Schwartz said the spud also stores well. Klondike Smiley has yellow flesh and light-pink skin with yellow markings that resemble smiling mouths. Schwartz explained it will be marketed as a child-friendly product and will feature Potandon’s first bag with Green Giant’s more youthful mascot, Sprout. Klondike Smiley will also come in microwavable packaging. Potandon will start shipping the two new varieties in November.

“The trade has really worked hard at bringing the yellow to the marketplace with better quality,” Schwartz said. “We expect the yellow potato category to continue to grow. At this point, nobody knows when it’s going to peak.”

Company representatives who helped evaluate Oregon States University’s first-year potato crosses showed a strong preference for specialty spuds with yellow flesh, said OSU breeder Sagar Sathuvalli. He tried to stimulate interest in a specialty spud with white flesh, but the industry representatives assured him white-fleshed specialty spuds are no longer marketable.

“If they see attractive mosaic patterns, they’re picking those up, and yellow flesh and yellow skin they’re picking up,” Sathuvalli said. “In every case they’re picking up the yellow flesh.”

At the retail level, reds have been promoted longer and still enjoy stronger demand than yellows, but interest in yellows is growing rapidly, said Ken Tubman, the Idaho Potato Commission’s marketing director for the Northeast and Canada.

“I think the golds are starting to come stronger,” Tubman said. “I see it ever improving.”

Jonathon Whitworth, a plant pathologist involved in the potato breeding program at the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service in Aberdeen, Idaho, has also noticed growth in yellows, both in produce aisles and within the Tri-State Potato Breeding Program. But Whitworth cautions, “It’s going to take the right varieties to fit that market, and overproduction will saturate it.”

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Americold opens third Idaho cold-storage facility http://www.capitalpress.com/Business/20141021/americold-opens-third-idaho-cold-storage-facility http://www.capitalpress.com/Business/20141021/americold-opens-third-idaho-cold-storage-facility#Comments Tue, 21 Oct 2014 12:23:23 -0400 CaRol Dumas http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029955 Americold has opened a cold-storage facility for agricultural products in Heyburn, Idaho, bringing to three the number of facilities the Atlanta-based company operates in the Gem State.

The company, which offers temperature-controlled warehousing and logistics to the food industry, announced the opening of the Heyburn facility on Monday, stating it would complement its other Idaho facilities in Burley and Nampa.

The 160,000-square-foot building has capacity for more than 17,000 pallets — 10,000 steel-racked and 7,000 bulk-storage positions, Daniel Cooke, Americold marketing director, told Capital Press.

The company provides warehouses for refrigerated and frozen ag products to support the food logistics industry, assisting with storage, transportation and delivery, he said.

The company’s customers include some of the largest companies represented in the frozen and refrigerated aisles in the supermarket. Americold stores and transports all of those products, from ice cream to meats and vegetables, Cooke said.

The company located a second facility in the Magic Valley of south-central Idaho in response to customers who were looking for additional space and non-customers looking for new space, he said.

“Our customers have told us — and our research has shown — that the Magic Valley region is poised for exponential growth potential in the dairy and agriculture industries, and the demand for temperature-controlled, secure storage is rapidly increasing,” Americold President and COO Fred Boehler, said in a press release.

The facility’s close proximity to the Union Pacific rail line and Interstate 84 provides customers greater transportation alternatives to suit their distribution models, he said.

The company is leasing a facility recently vacated by the Simplot Co., Cooke said. The property lies within the industrial park owned by the city of Burley and managed by the Boyer Co. of Ogden, Utah, said Doug Manning, Burley’s economic development director.

Americold has been in touch with Boyer for some time and was just waiting for Simplot to pull out, he said.

Americold had been looking for space and opportunity in the area and came in right behind Simplot, said Kae Cameron, executive director of the Mini-Cassia Chamber of Commerce.

Simplot had used the facility for cold storage and warehousing. It was a natural fit and a good opportunity for workers who lost their jobs with Simplot, she said.

Americold will condition the facility to accommodate the local dairy and agricultural market. The secured building, with 10 truck and seven rail dock doors, has the ability to maintain temperatures ranging from 5 degrees to 50 degrees, the company’s press release stated.

The company will employ as many as 35 people at the facility, the press release stated.

According to its website, Americold owns and operates more than 175 temperature-controlled warehouses, with 1 billion cubic feet of storage, in the U.S., Australia, New Zealand, China, Argentina and Canada. Its warehouses connect food producers, processors, distributors and retailers to consumers. The company serves more than 3,000 customers and employs 12,000 associates worldwide.

Online

Americold: www.americold.com

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Washington, Oregon potato farmers eye Southeast Asia http://www.capitalpress.com/Profit/20141021/washington-oregon-potato-farmers-eye-southeast-asia http://www.capitalpress.com/Profit/20141021/washington-oregon-potato-farmers-eye-southeast-asia#Comments Tue, 21 Oct 2014 11:28:10 -0400 Don Jenkins http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029959 Oregon and Washington agriculture officials will spend 10 days in the Philippines and Vietnam promoting Northwest potatoes.

Fresh U.S. potatoes can’t compete on price with homegrown or Chinese spuds, so the bistate delegation will stress quality, the Washington Department of Agriculture’s international marketing program manager, Joe Bippert, said.

“If we can get across the idea that the Northwest potato is a premium potato, we can demand a premium price,” he said.

The trade trip, which will involve the potato commissions from each state, will be partly funded by a $65,000 U.S. Department of Agriculture specialty crop grant.

After visiting the Philippines and Vietnam with Oregon representatives, the Washington delegation will spend two days in Myanmar, a country just now opening up to U.S. trade.

Washington is the No. 2 potato-producing state after Idaho. Oregon ranks fifth.

The state’s agriculture directors, Bud Hover of Washington, and Katy Coba of Oregon, will lead the mission. The trip, which begins Oct. 28 in Manila, will combine networking, politicking and cooking.

Delegation members plan to talk with importers, lobby for lower tariffs and show that potato cuisine doesn’t end with french fries.

Chef Leif Eric Benson, a member of the Oregon Potato Commission, will demonstrate potato-centric recipes to chefs at high-end restaurants in Manila, Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City.

Connell, Wash., farmer Ted Tschirky, one of two Washington potato growers on the trade mission, said he will stress that Northwest farmers can be relied on to produce a high-quality crop and that potatoes are “good for you, cooked in the right manner.”

“We’re highly dependent on creating new customers since our demand in the states is sliding a little bit, depending on the year,” he said.

The Philippines, Vietnam and Myanmar are potential growth markets for U.S. potatoes, though in different ways.

The Philippines began allowing the import of fresh U.S. potatoes in June 2013. The Philippines already was one of Washington’s top customers for processed potatoes, buying $42.9 million worth in 2013.

Processed potatoes for fast-food restaurants will remain Washington’s biggest market in the Philippines, but the trade mission will emphasize fresh potatoes, Bippert said.

Washington sold $335,000 worth of fresh potatoes there in 2013.

A USDA analysis this month reported that the number of U.S. potatoes coming into the Philippines is growing rapidly. Still, Filipinos are largely unaware about the availability, variety and uses of U.S. potatoes.

In Vietnam, the country’s first McDonald’s restaurant opened in February in Ho Chi Minh City, portending a greater demand for processed potatoes.

Washington exported $2.9 million worth of processed potatoes and $591,000 worth of fresh potatoes to Vietnam in 2013.

In Myanmar, the delegation will make contacts in what had been one of the most reclusive countries in the world.

Myanmar’s military rulers in 2011 opened the country of 53 million to U.S. trade. Washington sold $2.9 million of wheat in 2013 to Myanmar but little else.

“It’s really a brand new market,” Bippert said. “There is a big potential. They’re very dependent on trade. They import a lot of their food.”

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N.Y. grants $17.6 million to protect 21 farms http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20141021/ny-grants-176-million-to-protect-21-farms http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20141021/ny-grants-176-million-to-protect-21-farms#Comments Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:28:33 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029965 ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — The state agriculture department has granted $17.6 million to protect more than 6,400 acres of farmland across New York state, ensuring the land will remain agricultural and won’t be developed.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Monday that the funds will help preserve 21 farms in 12 counties, bringing the total acreage under the farmland protection program to approximately 59,000 acres.

The program protects viable farmland through perpetual conservation easements or shorter-term lease of development rights.

Since 1996, New York has awarded nearly $195 million for farmland protection projects in 29 counties.

Farms protected under the program remain taxable.

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Portland daily grain report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20141021/portland-daily-grain-report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20141021/portland-daily-grain-report#Comments Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:15:40 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029969 Portland, Ore., Tuesaday, Oct. 21

USDA Market News

Bids for grains delivered to Portland, Oregon during October by unit trains and barges, in dollars per bushel, except oats, corn and barley, in dollars per cwt. Bids for soft white wheat are for delivery periods as specified. Hard red winter wheat and dark northern spring wheat bids are for full October delivery. Bids for corn are for 30 day delivery.

In early trading December wheat futures trended 3.75 to 7.50 cents per bushel higher than Monday’s closes.

Bids for US 1 Soft White Wheat for October delivery in unit trains or barges were not fully established in early trading but bids were indicated as higher compared to Monday’s noon bids for the same delivery period. The higher Chicago December wheat futures supported cash bids.

Bids for 11.5 percent protein US 1 Hard Red Winter Wheat for October delivery were not fully established in early trading, but were indicated as higher compared to Monday’s noon bids in lining up with the higher Kansas City December wheat futures.

Bids for 14 percent protein non-guaranteed US 1 Dark Northern Spring Wheat for October delivery were not fully established in early trading but were indicated as higher compared to Monday’s noon bids. The higher Minneapolis December wheat futures supported cash bids.

Bids for US 2 Yellow Corn delivered to Portland and the Yakima Valley were not available.

All wheat bids in dollars per bushel

US 1 Soft White Wheat - delivered by Unit Trains and Barges

Oct mostly 6.8850, ranging 6.7600-7.0100

Nov 6.7500-7.0600

Dec 6.7500-7.1100

Jan 6.7950-7.1950

Feb 6.7950-7.1950

US 1 White Club Wheat - delivered by Unit Trains and Barges

Oct mostly 9.1350, ranging 9.0100-9.2600

Not fully established and limited.

US 1 Hard Red Winter Wheat - (Exporter bids-falling numbers of 300 or

better)

Ordinary protein 7.3775-7.6775

10 pct protein 7.3775-7.6775

11 pct protein 7.4575-7.7575

11.5 pct protein

Oct 7.4975-7.7975

12 pct protein 7.4975-7.7975

13 pct protein 7.4975-7.7975

Not fully established and limited.

US 1 Dark Northern Spring Wheat (with a minimum of 300 falling numbers, a maximum

of 0.5 part per million vomitoxin, and a maximum of one percent total damage)

13 pct protein 7.6300-7.7800

14 pct protein

Oct 9.0300-9.2300

15 pct protein 9.9800-10.0300

16 pct protein 10.7800-11.0300

Not fully established and limited.

US 2 Yellow Corn in dollars per CWT

Domestic-single rail cars

Delivered full coast-BN NA

Delivered to Portland NA

Rail and Truck del to Willamette Vly NA

Rail del to Yakima Valley NA

Truck del to Yakima Valley NA

US 2 Heavy White Oats in dollars per CWT 13.2500

Not well tested.

Exporter Bids Portland Rail/Barge Sep 2014

Averages in Dollars per bushel

US 1 Soft White by Unit Trains and Barges 6.7500

US 1 Hard Red Winter (Ordinary protein) 7.0200

US 1 Hard Red Winter (11.5% protein) 7.1500

US 1 Dark Northern Spring (14% protein) 8.3400

Source: USDA Market News Service, Portland, OR

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America says no to cappuccino potato chips http://www.capitalpress.com/Business/20141021/america-says-no-to-cappuccino-potato-chips http://www.capitalpress.com/Business/20141021/america-says-no-to-cappuccino-potato-chips#Comments Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:07:00 -0400 CANDICE CHOIAP Food Industry Writer http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029970 NEW YORK (AP) — America has rejected the idea of cappuccino-flavored Lay’s potato chips.

Frito-Lay says Wasabi Ginger won its contest that gives people a chance to create a new flavor, beating out the coffee-flavored chips and the two other finalists — Mango Salsa and Cheddar Bacon Mac & Cheese. Parent company PepsiCo Inc. says about 1 million total votes were cast online for the Do Us A Flavor promotion, a sales driver it has launched in more than a dozen countries.

In the U.S., bags of the four finalist flavors hit shelves in late July and people were able to vote on Facebook and Twitter for their favorites through this past weekend. It was the second year for the U.S. contest, which is designed to send customers to stores in search of the flavors. Last year’s winner, Cheesy Garlic Bread, is still on shelves.

The winner, Meneko Spigner McBeth, was informed at a dinner for finalists Monday night in New York City. McBeth, a registered nurse from Deptford, New Jersey, will get $1 million or a set percentage of a year in sales, whichever figure is larger.

Ram Krishnan, Frito-Lay’s chief marketing officer, said this year’s winner is evidence Americans want more ethnic flavors, even though the top four Lay’s flavors remain Original, Barbecue, Cheddar & Sour Cream and Sour Cream & Onion. He said he couldn’t have imagined Lay’s selling a Wasabi Ginger flavor when he joined the company eight years ago.

“We’re kind of getting into a new flavor territory,” Krishnan said. “When I went to school, Mexican food was exotic.”

As for the cappuccino flavor — which was described as “NASTY” and “gross” in some comments on Lay’s Facebook page — Krishnan defended its performance, although he wouldn’t say how many votes it got.

“The fact that it made it out of our selection process to make it to the final four is no small feat,” he said.

The contest began in the United Kingdom, where Frito-Lay sells chips under the Walkers brand. Since then, it was launched in 14 countries before coming to the U.S. last year. Winning flavors in other countries include Pizza in Saudi Arabia, Shrimp in Egypt, Sunday Roast in New Zealand, Pickled Cucumber in Serbia and Aline’s Caesar Salad in Australia.

Given its success, Krishnan said the company is looking to launch the contest in other countries as well.

Krishnan wouldn’t specify how much of a sales lift the contest provides. But in the latest quarter that ended Sept. 6, PepsiCo, based in Purchase, New York, said revenue for its Frito-Lay North America division rose 3 percent, reflecting a 2 percent gain in volume and 1 percent gain from higher prices.

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N. Dakota durum harvest, winter wheat planting near end http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20141021/n-dakota-durum-harvest-winter-wheat-planting-near-end http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20141021/n-dakota-durum-harvest-winter-wheat-planting-near-end#Comments Tue, 21 Oct 2014 09:58:15 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029972 FARGO, N.D. (AP) — North Dakota farmers are wrapping up the harvest of durum wheat and the planting of winter wheat.

The Agriculture Department says in its weekly crop report that both activities are 97 percent complete, after a week of dry and unseasonably warm weather.

The harvests of many late-season crops including soybeans and potatoes also are nearing completion, though the corn and sunflower harvests still lag well behind the average pace.

Pasture and range conditions in the state are rated 73 percent good to excellent. Stockwater supplies are rated 97 percent adequate to surplus.

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McDonald’s sales down, Chipotle up http://www.capitalpress.com/Business/20141021/mcdonalds-sales-down-chipotle-up http://www.capitalpress.com/Business/20141021/mcdonalds-sales-down-chipotle-up#Comments Tue, 21 Oct 2014 09:56:27 -0400 CANDICE CHOIAP Food Industry Writer http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029973 NEW YORK (AP) — McDonald’s says its profit and sales declined as the world’s biggest hamburger chain saw customer traffic fall around the world.

The company said sales fell 3.3 percent globally and in the U.S. during the third quarter. In the region encompassing Asia, where a major McDonald’s supplier was shown on TV repackaging expired beef, the figure fell 9.9 percent.

“By all measures our performance fell short of our expectations,” CEO Don Thompson said. The company, which has more than 35,000 locations around the world, said it expects its challenges will continue into the current quarter, with global sales to be down for October as well.

In the U.S., McDonald’s Corp. is fighting to hold onto customers amid intensifying competition and shifting tastes toward food people consider more wholesome. Chipotle, which touts the quality of its ingredients, said Monday its sales rose 19.8 percent at established locations. Steve Ells, co-CEO of the Mexican food chain, said the results show people are realizing “there are better alternatives to traditional fast food” and that he expects the trend to continue.

McDonald’s, meanwhile, has been working on improving its image. In addition to focusing on a simplified menu, the company said Tuesday its revamped marketing in the U.S. will stress its food quality.

Last week, for instance, McDonald’s launched a social media campaign inviting customers to ask questions about its food. It began with frank questions like, “Why doesn’t your food rot?” and “Is the McRib made from real pork?”, showing just how bad some of the perceptions about McDonald’s food can be.

In southern California, McDonald’s is also testing a “Build Your Own Burger” concept that lets people pick the bun, beef patty and toppings they want by tapping a touchscreen. The test is intended to address the popularity of places that let people customize their meal.

Affordability is another issue, with Thompson noting that the people who tend to go to McDonald’s are struggling more financially than customers who might go to other chains.

Over in China, an undercover TV report this summer showed one of its major suppliers repackaging expired meat. The plant stopped operations and many of McDonald’s restaurants in the country were left unable to sell burgers, chicken nuggets and other items. The chain’s reputation took a hit as well.

For the quarter, revenue declined to $6.99 billion, short of the $7.23 billion Wall Street expected. Net income declined to $1.07 billion, or $1.09 per share. Adjusted for one-time costs, earnings were $1.52 per share. Analysts expected $1.37 per share.

Shares of McDonald’s were down 2 percent at $89.60.

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Agrivita to export products to China http://www.capitalpress.com/Business/20141021/agrivita-to-export-products-to-china http://www.capitalpress.com/Business/20141021/agrivita-to-export-products-to-china#Comments Tue, 21 Oct 2014 09:37:17 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029975 RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Richmond-based Agrivita Biogroup Inc. has secured a trade agreement to export animal feed additives to China.

Gov. Terry McAuliffe announced the deal on Tuesday in a news release. McAuliffe is visiting China, Hong Kong, Japan and South Korea during his second international trade trip.

McAuliffe says Agrivita began exploring sales opportunities to China over the last year, with help from the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. The company registered its product in China in 2013 and shipped samples for feeding trials throughout the country earlier this year.

Agrivita President Arunas Vanagas says in the release that the company expects sales to increase from $400,000 this year to more than $1.5 million in 2015.

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Idaho second in West for net farm income http://www.capitalpress.com/Idaho/20141020/idaho-second-in-west-for-net-farm-income http://www.capitalpress.com/Idaho/20141020/idaho-second-in-west-for-net-farm-income#Comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 11:27:26 -0400 Sean Ellis http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029990 BOISE — Idaho trailed only California in the West for net farm income in 2012 and was more profitable than No. 3 Washington despite bringing in $1.7 billion less in farm gate receipts.

According to USDA data, Idaho ranked No. 2 among the 11 Western states in 2012, with $2.75 billion in net farm income.

California ranked No. 1 in the nation, with $16 billion in net farm income. Washington ranked third in the West, with $2.16 billion, despite leading Idaho in total farm gate receipts, $9.3 billion to $7.6 billion.

Those rankings were calculated by University of Idaho agricultural economists using USDA Economic Research Service data. Data needed to make comparisons for 2013 will be available in November.

They also show that Colorado ranked No. 4 in the West with $1.75 billion in net farm income in 2012 despite having the same amount of gross farm receipts as Idaho that year.

Though the rankings count for little more than bragging rights, farmers were intrigued by them.

“That’s actually kind of interesting,” said North Idaho farmer Robert Blair. “That’s something to be proud of.”

Washington has a lot of high-value crops compared with Idaho, but those crops also cost a lot to produce, said UI ag economist Garth Taylor.

“They have a lot of gross but the cost to produce those crops ate up ... more of their margins than it did in Idaho,” he said.

The ERS data show that Washington producers spent $5.2 billion on inputs in 2012, while Idaho producers spent $4.1 billion.

Washington producers spent $1.6 billion on manufactured inputs such as fertilizer, fuel and electricity, while Idaho producers spent $1.17 billion.

Washington producers spent $469 million for pesticides and $78 million for contract labor while Idaho producers spent $198 million and $39 million for those inputs.

Idaho only ranked ahead of Washington in net farm income three times in the 10 years prior to 2012 — in 2002, 2005 and 2008.

While the net farm income rankings shuffle from year to year, Washington does produce a lot of high-value crops, said Desmond O’Rourke, president of Belrose Inc. a private consulting firm out of Pullman.

“Their fixed costs tend to be high,” he said. “When prices are high, they make a lot of money. When they’re average, they don’t make as much and when prices are low, they lose a lot of money.”

New Mexico ranked fifth ($1.4 billion), Montana sixth ($1.3 billion), Oregon seventh ($960 million), Arizona eighth ($902 million), Utah ninth ($364 million), Wyoming 10th ($356 million) and Nevada 11th ($222 million).

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WTO panel rules COOL detrimental to Canada, Mexico http://www.capitalpress.com/20141020/wto-panel-rules-cool-detrimental-to-canada-mexico http://www.capitalpress.com/20141020/wto-panel-rules-cool-detrimental-to-canada-mexico#Comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 14:02:54 -0400 Carol Ryan Dumas http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029988 A WTO compliance panel has again ruled against the United States regarding the treatment accorded to imported Canadian and Mexican cattle under USDA’s 2013 final rule amending mandatory country of origin (COOL) labeling for beef and pork.

In addition, the WTO panel found the amended COOL measure increases the original COOL’s detrimental impact on the competitive opportunities of imported livestock in the U.S. market.

Monday’s ruling stated the amended COOL necessitates increased segregation of meat and livestock, entails a higher record keeping burden and increases the original COOL measure’s incentive to choose domestic over imported livestock.

As with the original COOL measure, the detrimental impact of the amended rule’s labeling and record keeping rules could not be explained by the need to convey to consumers information where livestock were born, raised and slaughtered, the panel concluded.

The WTO ruling that the COOL rule violates international trade obligations and the panel’s decision to uphold Canada’s and Mexico’s challenge to COOL came as no surprise to the U.S. meat industry.

National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), National Pork Producers Council (NPPC), American Meat Institute (AMI), and North American Meat Association (NAMA) all issued statements warning of retaliatory tariffs on U.S. products, including non-agricultural products.

WTO’s announcement “brings us all one step closer to facing retaliatory tariffs from two of our largest trading partners,” NCBA President Bob McCan said in a written statement.

COOL is a failed program that has already harmed U.S. beef producers, who have suffered discounts and faced the closure of a number of feedlots and packing plants, he said.

There is no regulatory fix for COOL, and industry and Congress must find a permanent solution, he said.

NPPC is calling on the White House and Congress to immediately address the issue.

“Retaliatory tariffs on pork would be financially devastating to U.S. pork producers,” NPPC President Howard Hill said in a written statement.

“The United States can’t afford to have its products restricted through tariffs to its No. 1and 2 export markets,” he said.

AMI and NAMA in a joint statement said while the U.S. can appeal the ruling, they encourage USTR and USDA to instead work together with the industry and Congress to amend COOL so it complies with international obligations and brings stability to the market.

“Such a change would help restore strong relationships with some of our largest and most important trading partners,” the two organizations stated.

National Farmers Union, which has defended COOL in U.S. courts and supports consumers’ right to know where their food comes from, said WTO continues to uphold the U.S.’ right to require labeling of meat products but found fault in how the rule was implemented.

“Under the guidance of USDA, any changes to ensure full compliance with today’s decision should be able to be made administratively, while maintaining the integrity of COOL labels,” NFU President Roger Johnson said in a written statement.

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Western hay markets http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20141020/western-hay-markets http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20141020/western-hay-markets#Comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:02:53 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029980 Hay prices are dollars per ton or dollars per bale when sold to retail outlets. Basis is current delivery FOB barn or stack, or delivered customer as indicated.

Grade guidelines used in this report have the following relationship to Relative Feed Value (RFV), Acid Detergent Fiber (ADF), TDN (Total Digestible Nutrients), or Crude Protein (CP) test numbers:

Grade RFV ADF TDN CP

Supreme 185+ <27 55.9+ 22+

Premium 170-185 27-29 54.5-55.9 20-22

Good 150-170 29-32 52.5-54.5 18-20

Fair 130-150 32-35 50.5-52.5 16-18

Utility <130 36+ <50.5 <16

WASHINGTON-OREGON HAY

(Columbia Basin)

(USDA Market News)

Moses Lake, Wash.

Oct. 17

This week FOB Last week Last year

1,080 6,000 3,105

Compared to Oct. 10: Alfalfa for domestic and export steady on a light test. Trade near standstill this week as rain showers where reported across the trade area. Demand light to moderate as some exporters are done for the season while dairies are busy doing fall harvest. Timothy for export and domestic use not tested this week due to light demand. Retail/Feedstore hay steady. Buyer demand good with moderate supplies.

Tons Price

Alfalfa Large Square Fair/Good 400 $220-225

200 $175

Alfalfa Small Square Premium 160 $260-270

Good/Prem. 90 $230-260

Orchard Grass Small Square Premium 130 $250-275

Timothy Grass Large Square Fair 100 $100

OREGON AREA HAY

(USDA Market News)

Portland, Ore.

Oct. 17

This week FOB Last week Last year

21,573 7,304 0

Compared to Oct. 10: Prices mostly steady compared to the previous week’s offerings for the same quality. Trading was light to moderate during the week with a larger volume of hay traded than last week. More producers have sold all that they plan to sell for this season.

Tons Price

CROOK, DESCHUTES, JEFFERSON, WASCO COUNTIES

Alfalfa Large Square Good 56 $210

Small Square Supreme 16 $260

Premium 31 $255

Alfalfa/Orchard Mix Small Square Premium 50 $250

7 $275

Orchard Grass Small Square Premium 34 $270

Barley Large Square Premium 168 $160

Wheat/Pea Mix Mid Square Good 400 $180

Grass Mix-Five Way Small Square Premium 16 $275

EASTERN OREGON

Alfalfa Large Square Good/Prem. 160 $230

HARNEY COUNTY

Alfalfa Large Square Supreme 27 $250

Good/Prem. 500 $210

Mixed Grass Small Square Premium 23 $185

Orchard/Timothy Large Square Premium 300 $195

KLAMATH BASIN

Alfalfa Small Square Supreme 200 $280

Premium 50 $250

Fair/Good 45 $175

LAKE COUNTY

Alfalfa Large Square Supreme 1065 $250-265

Premium 18,058 $225-235

Good 173 $180-185

Small Square Premium 30 $235

Good 30 $200

Alfalfa/Oat Mix Small Square Premium 25 $175

Grass Mix-Three Way Large Square Good/Prem. 33 $170

Good 50 $150-160

Oat Straw Large Square Utility 26 $45

IDAHO HAY

(USDA Market News)

Moses Lake, Wash.

Oct. 17

This week FOB Last week Last year

13,180 3,800 3,000

Compared to Oct. 10: Premium and Supreme testing Alfalfa $5-10 higher. Trade slow to moderate this week with good demand for non-rained on supplies. Retail/feed store/horse not tested this week.

Tons Price

Alfalfa Large Square Prem/.Sup. 2150 $190-250

Fair/Good 1000 $200

10,000 $185

Wheat Large Square Fair/Good 30 $55

CALIFORNIA HAY

(USDA Market News)

Moses Lake, Wash.

Oct. 17

This week FOB Last week Last year

5,150 8,850 NA

Compared to Oct. 10: All classes trading mostly steady with a weaker undertone noted. Demand light and trading activity slow. Most regions are finishing up or about to finish with the 2014 hay season. Some producers are opting to not cut their last cutting and turning livestock out to assist with the high feed costs. Other producers are sticking their remaining cuttings into the barn or under tarp until later this year or early 2015. Region 1 and parts of Region 2 received some rain this week, hindering the last cutting of the year. Region 3 is either finishing up on their sixth or beginning their seventh.

REGION 1: North Inter-Mountain

Includes the counties of Siskiyou, Modoc, Shasta, Lassen and Plumas.

Tons Price

Alfalfa Supreme 1000 $275-280

75 $310-315

Orchard Grass Premium 25 $300

REGION 2: Sacramento Valley

Includes the counties of Tehama, Glenn, Butte, Colusa, Sutter, Yuba, Sierra, Nevada, Placer, Yolo, El Dorado, Solano, Sacramento.

Tons Price

Alfalfa Supreme 200 $300

Premium 75 $240 Retail/Stable

Fair 500 $175 Grassy

Utility 125 $140-150

300 $160

Oat Hay Good 50 $240

Fair 50 $215

Sudan Good 200 $190

Wheat Straw Good 25 $135

REGION 3: Northern San Joaquin Valley

Includes the counties of San Joaquin, Calaveras, Stanislaus, Tuolumne, Mono, Merced and Mariposa.

Tons Price

Alfalfa Supreme 175 $260

250 $330

Premium 150 $285

25 $250

Fair 750 $197

REGION 4: Central San Joaquin Valley

No new sales confirmed.

REGION 5: Southern California

Includes the counties of Kern, Northeast Los Angeles, and Western San Bernardino.

Tons Price

Alfalfa Premium 25 $280

Good/Prem. 50 $260

REGION 6: Southeast California

Includes the counties of Eastern San Bernardino, Riverside and Imperial.

Tons Price

Alfalfa Premium 100 $225

Fair 1000 $140

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California shell egg report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20141020/california-shell-egg-report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20141020/california-shell-egg-report#Comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:58:43 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029981 Shell egg marketers’ benchmark price for negotiated egg sales of USDA Grade AA and Grade AA in cartons, cents per dozen. This price does not reflect discounts or other contract terms.

DAILY CALIFORNIA SHELL EGGS

(USDA Market News)

Des Moines, Iowa

Oct. 17

Benchmark prices are steady. Asking prices for next week are unchanged on all sizes. Trade sentiment is steady. Demand is moderate to fairly good. Offerings are light to mostly moderate. Supplies are balanced for current needs. Market activity is slow to mostly moderate. Small benchmark price $1.25.

Size Range Size Range

Jumbo 159 Extra large 166

Large 159 Medium 145

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Prices to retailers, sales to volume buyers, USDA Grade AA and Grade AA, white eggs in cartons, delivered store door.

Size Range Size Range

Jumbo 141-153 Extra large 144-156

Large 136-147 Medium 125-134

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West Coast grain markets http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20141020/west-coast-grain-markets http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20141020/west-coast-grain-markets#Comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:56:36 -0400 Grains are stated in dollars per bushel or hundredweight (cwt.) except feed grains traded in dollars per ton. National grain report bids are fo http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029982 National slaughter, feeder and stocker cattle report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20141020/national-slaughter-feeder-and-stocker-cattle-report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20141020/national-slaughter-feeder-and-stocker-cattle-report#Comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:51:13 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029983 Cattle prices in dollars per hundredweight (cwt.) except some replacement animals per pair or head as indicated.

NATIONAL SLAUGHTER CATTLE

(Federal-State Market News)

Oklahoma City-Des Moines

Oct. 17

Compared to Oct. 10: Direct trade on a live basis is steady to firm. Dressed sales in Nebraska steady to firm.

Boxed beef prices Oct. 17 averaged $241.72, which is $.51 higher than Oct. 10. The Choice/Select spread is $14.38. Slaughter cattle on a national basis for negotiated cash trades through Oct. 17 totaled about 42,000 head. The previous week’s total head count was 132,714 head.

Midwest Direct Markets: Live Basis: Steers and Heifers 35-80 Percent Choice, 1200-1400 lbs. $164 Dressed Basis: Steers and Heifers: $258.

South Plains Direct Markets: Live Basis: Steers and Heifers 35-65 percent Choice, 1100-1400 lbs. $164.

Slaughter Cows and Bulls (Average Yielding Prices): Slaughter cows steady to firm. Slaughter bulls steady to $1 higher.

USDA’s Cutter cow carcass cut-out value Oct. 17 was $233.61 up $.31 from Oct. 10.

NATIONAL FEEDER AND STOCKER CATTLE

(Federal-State Market News)

St. Joseph, Mo.

Oct. 17

This week Last week Last year

291,600 264,400 202,900

Compared to Oct. 10: Yearling feeders along with steer and heifer calf prices were very uneven and posted wide trend swings just within the single week’s trading session. Early week feeder and stocker trends were very uneven ranging from steady to $5 higher to $5 lower. From mid-week on many auctions were instances as much as $8-10 lower.

The Northern Plains is the best place to sell many of the calves and 700-950 lb. yearlings with long strings and load lots coming off grass selling with very good demand. Over the last week Live and Feeder Cattle futures have seen great price volatility as buyers and sellers have had to remain cautious as on Oct. 14 and 15 Feeder Cattle contracts imploded with mostly limit losses in the feeder pit.

This is in part being accelerated by the heavy sell-off in the Stock Market since Oct. 9 and continuing into this week. The Dow closed on Wednesday with losses of 173 points and at one time had declined 460 points to close at 16,141. Growing concerns about economic growth mainly in Europe and Asia has caused market participants to sell off assets and be in a very defensive mood. This has cattle futures and many other agriculture commodities falling into that category.

Also, escalating concerns over the Ebola virus spreading further in the U.S. has investors nervous as well. December Live Cattle has dropped near $8 from Oct. 3 record high to this Oct. 15 low as November feeder cattle has dropped over $11 during the same time period. But despite these losses packers failed to exploit sharply lower futures as fat cattle traded near steady money on Oct. 15 afternoon mostly at $164 with a few at $165 in Nebraska and the Southern Plains with dressed sales steady at $258.

Hopefully with the fat cattle trade holding onto steady money in the face of these adversities can stabilize cattle traderís fears. Then on Oct. 16 Live Cattle and Feeder Cattle contracts did stabilize and rocked the bear back and closed with near limit gains for Live Cattle and limit gains for Feeder Cattle contracts. But volatility still dominates this market as on Friday Feeder Cattle contracts closed mostly limit down as traders attempt to make sense of a wild trading week.

Despite the lower prices this week in the feeder cattle market we are still at all-time highs and back to prices in many areas we had two to three weeks ago. On Oct. 13 at Torrington, Wyo., 170 head of fancy steer calves averaging 416 lbs. sold with a weighted average price of $400.69. In Aberdeen, S.D., the Hub City Livestock Market on Oct. 14 sold 497 head of steers weighing between 780-797 lbs. averaging 791 lbs. sold with a weighted average price $252.75. This week’s auction volume included 42 percent over 600 lbs. and 39 percent heifers.

AUCTIONS

This week Last week Last year

247,800 231,600 135,000

WASHINGTON 5,800. 53 pct over 600 lbs. 43 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs. $315.76; 400-450 lbs. $296.42; 450-500 lbs. $304.17; 500-550 lbs. $271.04; 550-600 lbs. $259.42; 650-700 lbs. $253.83; 700-750 lbs. $232.33; 750-800 lbs. $230.36; 800-850 lbs. $210.27. Heifers: Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs. $266.49; 450-500 lbs. $263.51; 500-550 lbs. $256.46; 550-600 lbs. $256.77; 600-650 lbs. $241.53; 650-700 lbs. $241.73; 700-750 lbs. $222.59; 750-800 lbs. $217.80.

DIRECT

This week Last week Last year

23,800 21,800 67,900

SOUTHWEST (Arizona-California-Nevada) 900. No cattle over 600 lbs. No heifers. Holsteins: Large 3 Del March 300 lbs. $270; 325 lbs. $306.

NORTHWEST (Washington-Oregon-Idaho) 2,100. 62 pct over 600 lbs. 60 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB Delivery 550 lbs. $245 western Oregon. Current Delivery Delivered Price: 850-900 lbs. $221 Idaho. Holsteins: Large 2-3 Current FOB Delivery 350 lbs. $220-240 Washington. Heifers: Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB Delivery 500 lbs. $230 Western Oregon. Current Delivery Delivered Price 750-800 lbs. $237.50-238 Idaho; 850-900 lbs. $212-215 Idaho.

NORTHWEST DIRECT CATTLE

(USDA Market News)

Moses Lake, Wash.

Oct. 17

This week Last week Last year

2,100 2,000 2,000

Compared to Oct. 10: Feeder cattle steady. Trade slow with good demand. Seems safe to say that both sides are confused at this point regarding price potential thanks to the extreme price volatility seen at the CME so far this week. Live and feeder contracts are sharply lower once again this week with several feeder months quoted limit lower for the second consecutive session.

Again, long liquidation and technical bearishness appear to be the main negative forces at work. The feeder supply included 40 percent steers and 60 percent heifers. Near 62 percent of the supply weighed over 600 lbs. Prices are FOB weighing point with a 1-4 percent shrink or equivalent and with a 5-10 cent slide on calves and a 3-7 cent slide on yearlings. Delivered prices include freight, commissions and other expenses.

Steers: Medium and Large 1-2: Current FOB Delivery: 550 lbs. $245 Western Oregon. Current Delivery Delivered Price: 850-900 lbs. $221 Idaho.

Holstein Steers: Large 2-3: Current FOB Delivery: 350 lbs. $220-240 Washington.

Heifers: Medium and Large 1-2: Current FOB Delivery: 500 lbs. $230 Western Oregon. Current Delivery Delivered Price: 750-800 lbs. $237.50-238 Idaho; 850-900 lbs. $212-215 Idaho.

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Selected Western livestock auctions http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20141020/selected-western-livestock-auctions http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20141020/selected-western-livestock-auctions#Comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:42:54 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029984 Cattle prices in dollars per hundredweight (cwt.) except some replacement animals per pair or head as indicated.

California

SHASTA

(Shasta Livestock Auction)

Cottonwood, Calif.

Oct. 17

Current week Last week

1,881 975

Compared to Oct. 10: Slaughter cows and bulls steady. Tougher week for most classes, except for heifers w/replacement value and yearlings. Most other classes under 650 lbs. $5-5 lower. Small lots and singles $20-50 lower than top offerings.

Slaughter cows: Breakers $103-111, $112-123 high dress; Boning $94-102; Cutters $80-93.

Bulls 1 and 2: $105-120; $121-135 high dress.

Feeder steers: 450-500 lbs. $264-300; 500-550 lbs. $250-280.50; 550-600 lbs. $235-271; 600-650 lbs. $228-254; 650-700 lbs. $225-253; 700-750 lbs. $220-247; 750-800 lbs. $217-231; 800-900 lbs. $215-229.

Feeder heifers: 400-450 lbs. $250-285; 450-500 lbs. $231-269; 500-550 lbs. $225-254; 550-600 lbs. $216-245; 600-650 lbs. $212-247; 650-700 lbs. $212-241; 700-750 lbs. $222-236; 750-800 lbs. $230-231; 800-900 lbs. $206.

Calvy cows: No market test.

Pairs: No market test.

Idaho

CALDWELL

(Treasure Valley Livestock)

Oct. 17

Steers: 200-300 lbs. $226.25; 300-400 lbs. $218.75; 400-500 lbs. $177.25; 500-600 lbs. $156.25; 600-700 lbs. $178.50; 700-800 lbs. $171.75; 800-900 lbs. $151.75; 900-1000 lbs. $150.75; 1000 lbs. and up $126.

Heifers: 200-300 lbs. $248.25; 300-400 lbs. $236.25; 400-500 lbs. $190.25; 500-600 lbs. $189.50; 600-700 lbs. $176.50; 700-800 lbs. $162.25; 800-900 lbs. $109..25; 900-1000 lbs. $153.25; 1000 lbs. and up $111.

Cows (wt.): 700-800 lbs. $91.50; 800-900 lbs. $79; 900-1000 lbs. $97; 1000-1100 lbs. $99.50; 1100-1200 lbs. $96; 1200-1300 lbs. $102; 1300-1400 lbs. $98.75; 1400-1500 lbs. $106.50; 1500-1600 lbs. $107.25; 1600-1700 lbs. $110.25; 1900-2000 lbs. $110.

Bull calves (wt.): 200-300 lbs. $280.75; 300-400 lbs. $238.25; 400-500 lbs. $178.25; 500-600 lbs. $172.75; 600-700 lbs. $161.50; 700-800 lbs. $190; 800-900 lbs. $112.50; 900-1000 lbs. $88; 1300-1400 lbs. $121; 1400-1500 lbs. $128.

Bulls (wt.): 1500-1600 lbs. $119; 1700-1800 lbs. $129; 2000-2100 lbs. $124.

Pairs (hd.): 1000 lbs. and up $1125.

Bred heifers (hd.): 800 lbs. and up $1735.

Stock cows (hd.): 800 lbs. and up $1230.

Bull calves (hd.): 100-200 lbs. $295; 200-300 lbs. $600; 300-400 lbs. $260.

Heifer calves (hd.): 100-200 lbs. $335; 200-300 lbs. $370; 300-400 lbs. $220.

Steer calves (hd.): 100-200 lbs. $285; 200-300 lbs. $415; 400-500 lbs. $225.

Washington

TOPPENISH

(Toppenish Livestock Auction)

(USDA Market News)

Moses Lake, Wash.

Oct. 17

This week Last week Last year

1,645 2,400 NA

Compared to Oct. 10 at the same market: Stocker and feeder cattle steady to weak in a light test. Trade slow to moderate with light to moderate demand as most offerings where offered in small lots and singles. Slaughter cows and bulls steady. Trade moderate to active with good demand. Slaughter cows 66 percent, Slaughter bulls 10 percent, and feeders 24 percent of the supply. The feeder supply included 38 percent steers and 62 percent heifers. Near 68 percent of the run weighed over 600 lbs.

Feeder Steers: Medium and Large 1-2: 300-400 lbs. $310; 400-500 lbs. $281; 500-600 lbs. $245; 600-700 lbs. $230; 600-700 lbs. $238-241, Calves; 700-800 lbs. $213-227; 800-900 lbs. $200-201. Large 1-2: 900-1000 lbs. $193.50. Small and Medium 1-2: 400-500 lbs. $245-248; 600-700 lbs. $202.50.

Feeder Heifers: Medium and Large 1-2: 400-500 lbs. $257; 500-600 lbs. $251; 500-600 lbs. $242-260, Replacement; 600-650 lbs. $247, Replacement; 600-700 lbs. $220; 600-700 lbs. $235-239, Calves; 600-700 lbs. $228, Full; 700-800 lbs. $210-213.75; 800-900 lbs. $200; 800-900 lbs. $212, Thin Fleshed. Large 1-2: 900-1000 lbs. $184.75; 1000-1100 lbs. $185. Small and Medium 1-2: 400-500 lbs. $230-240. Small and Medium 2-3: 500-600 lbs. $225, Yearlings.

Slaughter Cows:

Boning 80-85 percent lean 1100-1900 lbs. $108-114; Lean 85-90 percent lean 1100-1700 lbs. $107-113; Lean 90 percent lean 1000-1500 lbs. $94-98.

Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade 1-2 1700-2400 lbs. $126-136.

Oregon

VALE

(Producers Livestock Market)

Oct. 15

Total receipts: 1,583 head.

Market comment: Steady with good demand on the light calves under 475 lbs. 550-850 wt. heavier calves and yearlings under pressure due to lower futures and weather related weaning problems.

Steer calves: 300-400 lbs. $343-388; 400-500 lbs. $267-327; 500-600 lbs. $240-283.

Heifer calves: 300-400 lbs. $318-347; 400-500 lbs. $238-292; 500-600 lbs. $203-248.

Yearling steers : 600-700 lbs. $196-255; 700-800 lbs. $184-229; 900-100 lbs. $184-194.

Yearling heifers: 600-700 lbs. $203-232; 700-800 lbs. $183-208; 800-900 lbs. $158-198.

Stock cows (young): $1575-1985.

Pairs: $2200-2785.

Butcher cows: $97-111.

Thin shelly cows: $78-96.

Younger heiferettes: $127-151.

Butcher bulls: $92-118.

Oregon

MADRAS

(Central Oregon Livestock Auction)

Oct. 13

Steers: 200-300 lbs. $350-385; 300-400 lbs. $340-370; 400-500 lbs. $280-340; 500-600 lbs. $260-280; 600-700 lbs. $245-270; 700-800 lbs. $227-245; 800-900 lbs. $205-226.

Bulls: High yield. $131; mostly $127; thinner $115.

Pairs: Full-mouth Vacc $2000-2500.

Heifers: 200-300 lbs. $330-360; 300-400 lbs. $300-335; 400-500 lbs. $260-285; 500-600 lbs. $245-267; 600-700 lbs. $225-250; 700-800 lbs. $195-224.

Heiferettes: 1000 lbs. and down $170-195; 1000 lbs. and up $145-170.

Butcher Cows: High yield. $121.50; fleshy $110; med. flesh $87; thin older $84.

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National wool and sheep report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20141020/national-wool-and-sheep-report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20141020/national-wool-and-sheep-report#Comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:38:03 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029985 Wool prices in cents per pound and foreign currency per kilogram, sheep prices in dollars per hundredweight (cwt.) except some replacement animals on per head basis as indicated.

NATIONAL WOOL REVIEW

(USDA Market News)

Greeley, Colo.

Oct. 17

Domestic wool trading on a clean basis was at a standstill this week and there were no confirmed trades. Demand good and trade activity moderate for this time of year. Domestic wool trading on a greasy basis was at a standstill this week. There were no confirmed trades.

Domestic wool tags

No. 1 $.60-.70

No. 2 $.50-.60

No. 3 $.40-.50

NATIONAL SHEEP SUMMARY

(USDA Market News)

San Angelo, Texas

Oct. 17

Compared to last week: Slaughter lambs were steady to $5 higher. Slaughter ewes were steady to $5 lower. Feeder lambs were steady to $8 lower, except at Billings, Mont., steady to $3 higher. At San Angelo, Texas, 4,710 head sold in a one-day sale. Equity Electronic Auction sold 340 slaughter lambs in North Dakota. In direct trading slaughter ewes and feeder lambs were not tested. 6,300 head of negotiated sales of slaughter lambs were weak and 4,900 head of formula sales of carcasses under 55 lbs. were not well tested; 55-65 lbs. were $1-2 higher; 65-75 lbs. were $6-7 higher; 75-85 lbs. were steady to $1 higher and over 85 lbs. were not well tested. 6,601 lamb carcasses sold with 45 lbs. and down $27.10 lower; 45-55 lbs. $6.84 lower and 55 lbs. and up steady to $2 higher.

SLAUGHTER LAMBS Choice and Prime 2-3:

San Angelo: shorn and wooled 100-140 lbs. $150-164.

SLAUGHTER LAMBS Choice and Prime 1:

San Angelo: 40-60 lbs. $220-232, few 240-246; 60-70 lbs. $200-216; 70-80 lbs. $200-204; 80-90 lbs. $184-190, few $200-202; 90-105 lbs. $176-183.

DIRECT TRADING (Lambs with 3-4 percent shrink or equivalent):

6,300 Slaughter Lambs shorn and wooled 100-165 lbs. $148-172 (wtd avg $162.23); pkg over 170 lbs. $159.

SLAUGHTER EWES:

San Angelo: Good 2-3 (fleshy) $53-60; Utility and Good 1-3 medium flesh) $55-66, high-yielding $68-72; Utility 1-2 (thin) $48-56; Cull and Utility 1-2 (very thin) $43-48; Cull 1 (extremely thin) $25-40.

FEEDER LAMBS Medium and Large 1-2:

San Angelo: 60-70 lbs. $200-212; 70-90 lbs. $200-205; 90-100 lbs. $190-201.

REPLACEMENT EWES Medium and Large 1-2:

San Angelo: no test.

NATIONAL WEEKLY LAMB CARCASS Choice and Prime 1-4:

Weight Wtd. avg.

45 lbs. down $416.41

45-55 lbs. $374.39

55-65 lbs. $346.47

65-75 lbs. $337.69

75-85 lbs. $328.13

85 lbs. and up $318.08

Sheep and lamb slaughter under federal inspection for the week to date totaled 37,000 compared with 40,000 last week and 41,000 last year.

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Citizens panel weighs in on tax breaks for Washington food processors http://www.capitalpress.com/Washington/20141020/citizens-panel-weighs-in-on-tax-breaks-for-washington-food-processors http://www.capitalpress.com/Washington/20141020/citizens-panel-weighs-in-on-tax-breaks-for-washington-food-processors#Comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 09:54:52 -0400 Don Jenkins http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029993 OLYMPIA, Wash. — State lawmakers should specify what they expect from food processors in return for tax breaks, an advisory panel says.

The five-member citizens commission on tax preferences was silent on whether seafood companies, dairy product manufacturers and fruit and vegetable processors should remain exempt from paying taxes on gross revenues.

The commission did say lawmakers should figure out how to objectively measure whether the tax breaks help workers. Commissioners left the details to legislators, though they offered guidelines for judging success.

Lawmakers have long used the state’s business and occupation tax to encourage businesses to invest. The Legislature created the Citizen Commission for Performance Measurement of Tax Preferences to study whether specific tax cuts do more than swell corporate profits.

The commission looked at the tax breaks for food processors because the exemptions are due to sunset June 30.

The exemption saves 185 Washington fruit and vegetable processors, including wineries, about $19 million a year, according to the state Department of Revenue.

Some 17 dairy product makers save about $4 million, while 46 seafood handlers save about $2 million annually in taxes.

Before renewing the tax breaks, lawmakers should set ways to measure whether workers are actually benefiting, the tax preference commission decided.

Legislative auditors suggested focusing on wages and the number of jobs.

A commission member, Seattle tax consultant Ron Bueing, argued that was the wrong approach, especially for agricultural industries embracing labor-saving technologies.

Lawmakers should measure success by whether processors stay in Washington rather than moving to Canada or neighboring states, he said.

Bueing’s argument was persuasive. The commission adopted a recommendation that shifted the focus from job creation to job retention.

The change aligned with the position of the Northwest Food Processors Association.

“I think it’s very wise to look at the bigger picture,” the association’s lobbyist, Ian Tolleson, said in a phone interview. “We have to realize other states are competing for our businesses.”

Lawmakers exempted the three food-handling industries from business and occupation taxes in 2006. Legislative auditors in 2012 recommended ending the exemptions, but legislators extended them until at least mid-2015.

If lawmakers take no action next year, the processors will pay taxes, but at a rate that’s lower than the standard tax on manufacturers and wholesalers.

Legislative auditors say lawmakers haven’t clearly declared why seafood, dairy, fruit and vegetable processors should pay a preferential rate. Some other food processors pay the standard rate.

The preferential tax would cost fruit and vegetable processors a total of about $6.1 million a year on gross revenues of nearly $4.5 billion, according to a projection by the Economic & Revenue Forecast Council.

If the tax were set at the standard rate, the tax bill would be an estimated $21 million a year.

Tolleson said processors will lobby for the exemption to be extended.

“If you allow it to sunset, you will have a tax increase, which discourages creating and retaining jobs,” he said. “To keep our jobs, we have to maintain rates processors are paying now,” he said.

The citizens commission recommended lawmakers decide if and when they will follow through on an earlier promise to tax all food processors equally.

Currently, processors pay a hodgepodge of tax rates depending on what they make and where the products are sold.

The forecast council projects two-year gross revenues for dairy product makers at $2.65 billion, resulting in a $3.51 million tax bill for the 2015-17 biennium at the preferential rate.

Seafood companies would pay $1.4 million on gross revenues of $1 billion, according to projections.

Fruit and vegetable processors employed 12,550 workers in 2012 with an average annual wage of $38,884, according to a survey by the department of revenue.

Dairy manufacturers employed 1,374 workers with an average annual wage of $45,178. Seafood companies reported having 2,834 workers with an average wage of $57,955.

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Portland daily grain report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20141020/portland-daily-grain-report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20141020/portland-daily-grain-report#Comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 09:46:17 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029994 Portland, Ore., Monday, Oct, 20

USDA Market News

Bids for grains delivered to Portland, Oregon during October by unit trains and barges, in dollars per bushel, except oats, corn and barley, in dollars per cwt. Bids for soft white wheat are for delivery periods as specified. Hard red winter wheat and dark northern spring wheat bids are for full October delivery. Bids for corn are for 30 day delivery.

In early trading December wheat futures trended 3.50 to five cents per bushel lower than Friday’s closes.

Bids for US 1 Soft White Wheat for October delivery in unit trains or barges were not fully established in early trading but bids were indicated as mixed compared to Friday’s noon bids for the same delivery period.

Bids for 11.5 percent protein US 1 Hard Red Winter Wheat for October delivery were not fully established in early trading, but were indicated as lower compared to Friday’s noon bids in lining up with the lower

Kansas City December wheat futures.

Bids for 14 percent protein non-guaranteed US 1 Dark Northern Spring Wheat for October delivery were not fully established in early trading but were indicated as lower compared to Friday’s noon bids. The lower Minneapolis December wheat futures pressured cash bids.

Bids for US 2 Yellow Corn delivered to Portland and the Yakima Valley were not available.

All wheat bids in dollars per bushel

US 1 Soft White Wheat - delivered by Unit Trains and Barges

Oct mostly 6.8150, ranging 6.7150-6.9150

Nov 6.7150-6.9650

Dec 6.7150-7.0150

Jan 6.7400-7.0900

Feb 6.7400-7.0900

US 1 White Club Wheat - delivered by Unit Trains and Barges

Oct mostly 9.0650, ranging 8.9150-9.2150

Not fully established and limited.

US 1 Hard Red Winter Wheat - (Exporter bids-falling numbers of 300 or

better)

Ordinary protein 7.3125-7.6125

10 pct protein 7.3125-7.6125

11 pct protein 7.3925-7.6925

11.5 pct protein

Oct 7.4325-7.7325

12 pct protein 7.4325-7.7325

13 pct protein 7.4325-7.7325

Not fully established and limited.

US 1 Dark Northern Spring Wheat (with a minimum of 300 falling numbers, a maximum

of 0.5 part per million vomitoxin, and a maximum of one percent total damage)

13 pct protein 7.5550-7.7050

14 pct protein

Oct 8.9550-9.1550

15 pct protein 9.9050-9.9550

16 pct protein 10.7050-10.9550

Not fully established and limited.

US 2 Yellow Corn in dollars per CWT

Domestic-single rail cars

Delivered full coast-BN NA

Delivered to Portland NA

Rail and Truck del to Willamette Vly NA

Rail del to Yakima Valley NA

Truck del to Yakima Valley NA

US 2 Heavy White Oats in dollars per CWT 13.2500

Not well tested.

Exporter Bids Portland Rail/Barge Sep 2014

Averages in Dollars per bushel

US 1 Soft White by Unit Trains and Barges 6.7500

US 1 Hard Red Winter (Ordinary protein) 7.0200

US 1 Hard Red Winter (11.5% protein) 7.1500

US 1 Dark Northern Spring (14% protein) 8.3400

Source: USDA Market News Service, Portland, OR

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Texas State Fair sets food, ride sales record http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20141020/texas-state-fair-sets-food-ride-sales-record http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20141020/texas-state-fair-sets-food-ride-sales-record#Comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 09:29:10 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029995 DALLAS (AP) — Organizers say this year’s State Fair of Texas set a new record for food and ride sales, with more than $41 million in coupons sold.

The fair said in a statement that the previous record was $37.3 million worth of coupons in 2010.

Temperatures that were largely mild and few storms helped bolster the 24-day event, which wrapped up Sunday. It’s been held since 1886.

Among the new attractions this year was an exhibit featuring some memorabilia from the Texas Sports Hall of Fame. The livestock department also had 12 percent more territory for exhibitors than in 2013.

The fair offered $3 admission to visitor bringing three cans of food on Wednesdays, and collected more than 240,000 pounds of food. That was an 18 percent increase from last year.

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Idle Iowa beef plant prepares to reopen this month http://www.capitalpress.com/Business/20141020/idle-iowa-beef-plant-prepares-to-reopen-this-month http://www.capitalpress.com/Business/20141020/idle-iowa-beef-plant-prepares-to-reopen-this-month#Comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 09:29:05 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029996 TAMA, Iowa (AP) — A long-idle beef processing plant is getting ready to reopen in Tama later this month.

Iowa Premium Beef officials recently took reporters on a tour of the plant that had been closed since 2004, the Waterloo-Cedar Falls Courier reports.

The plant has undergone a $48.6 million renovation to prepare to process about 1,100 cattle a day. If the business is successful serving food service, retail and international customers, production could double eventually.

The plant could eventually employ more than 600 workers. To qualify for $4 million in state tax credits, 120 of the workers will have to earn at least $15.42 an hour.

Iowa Premium Beef CEO Jeffrey Johnson says the company has already received more than 1,000 applications to work at the plant.

“We’re really geared on making sure that we have a sustainable place where 600-plus people can provide for their families and their investors have a return on their investment and a community they can build and grow on,” Johnson said. “As we grow, the community grows.”

The company plans to sell about 70 percent of its beef domestically and export about 30 percent.

Some of the upgrades to the plant were completed to address environmental concerns and improve efficiency. Johnson said $7.5 million was spent on a new mechanical wastewater system.

“The investors and managers said we got to make sure when we go to market we’re very conscious of environmental concerns, we’re very conscious of food safety, we’re very conscious about employee safety, also,” he said.

The company also covered its wastewater lagoons, so it will be able to collect methane gas and use in to help fuel its boilers. Johnson said that system should reduce the plant’s natural gas needs by about 30 percent.

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Canadian Pacific ends CSX deal talks http://www.capitalpress.com/Business/20141020/canadian-pacific-ends-csx-deal-talks http://www.capitalpress.com/Business/20141020/canadian-pacific-ends-csx-deal-talks#Comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 09:14:16 -0400 TOM MURPHYAP Business Writer http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141029998 Canadian Pacific Railway has ended talks with U.S. counterpart CSX about a possible combination and plans no more discussions.

The railway operator did not say on Monday why it ended talks, but it did note in a brief statement that regulatory concerns appear to be a major deterrent for railroads considering combinations.

A CSX spokeswoman declined to comment on Canadian Pacific’s statement.

Several reports had surfaced recently that CSX Corp. had rejected a merger offer from Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd. Both railroads declined to comment on the deal talk, but CSX CEO Michael Ward did say last week that the Surface Transportation Board, which regulates freight rail prices, would likely take a cautious approach to consolidation because there are only six Class I railroads in the U.S. and Canada.

Jacksonville, Florida-based CSX Corp. operates more than 21,000 miles of track in 23 Eastern states and two Canadian provinces. Other large railroads include Norfolk Southern, Union Pacific, BNSF and Canadian National.

Ward also said last week that past railroad mergers in the 1990s lead to poorer service after the deals as the companies worked to integrate the different railroads.

Canadian Pacific said Monday that it believed that regulatory approvals would be achievable for the right deal.

Railroad lobbyists have told Congress that the industry is struggling to keep up with a sharp increase in freight rail demand created in part by an oil fracking boom and two years of unusually bountiful harvests. Shippers have complained that widespread delays in freight rail shipments are hurting an array of industries.

Canadian Pacific said that a “pro-competition, customer-friendly” railway combination that also focuses on safety is a solution that could not be ignored on its merits by regulators. The railroad operator added that the industry’s significant problems “will only worsen over time if solutions aren’t put in place immediately.”

CSX shares fell 2.9 percent, or 99 cents, to $32.87 in midday trading Monday while broader indexes were nearly flat. The stock had climbed about 18 percent so far this year, as of Friday’s close, while the Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose about 2 percent.

U.S.-traded shares of Canadian Pacific dropped $1.06 to $198.44.

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Permaculture farming seen as a match for Southwest http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20141018/permaculture-farming-seen-as-a-match-for-southwest http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20141018/permaculture-farming-seen-as-a-match-for-southwest#Comments Wed, 15 Oct 2014 09:48:30 -0400 JIM MIMIAGACortez Journal http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141019927 CORTEZ, Colo. (AP) — “A forest full of food” has a nice ring to it, and the concept is realized using permaculture farming techniques.

Grant and Kathy Curry, of Dolores, are creating an innovative farm at the head of Trail Canyon that they hope will produce food for generations while skimping on water.

Permaculture farming uses natural ecosystems that rely on crops that complement each other. They are designed to regenerate year to year.

“I want to enter the garden and bump my head on hanging fruit, to have raspberries and nuts at my feet and vegetables that come up every year on their own,” says Grant Curry, a slim, knowledgeable man in his 50s. When not farming he works as registered nurse in Chinle, Arizona.

The Currys are committed to holistic practices and a back-to-the-garden lifestyle. Their solar-powered home is off the grid, they catch rain (with a permit), have greenhouses, raise their food, and host agricultural programs at their 80-acre Hananiah’s Rest Ranch.

Grant recently became a certified permaculture designer. He plans to help area families foster more efficient gardening.

This summer, with occasional help from their grown children, the Currys installed a twisting 3,800-foot swale and 2,000-foot berm structure, then planted 600 trees and shrubs on it.

The climate of the Southwest is known for its low annual rainfall, which seems to either never come or to come all at once.

Kathy Curry said the serpentine berm-swale system catches the water, slows it down and allows it to soak in. Over time, a plume of moist earth gets bigger and bigger, an ideal environment for growing food.

“The berm acts like a sponge, drawing up the water to the food forest,” Grant said. “Under the trees, we’re planting vegetables, nuts, berries, everything will be food, enough to feed 100 people.”

The trees eventually create a micro-climate, creating shade and dew, which also moisten the soil. Permaculture farming can bump up the usual 12 inches of precipitation per year to the equivalent of 18 inches per year, Curry said.

“The Navajo Nation is very dry with limited precipitation; I feel more families can benefit from this,” he said. “It’s a great opportunity for food security.”

The couple’s enthusiasm has caught the attention of the Colorado Permaculture Convergence, which will hold its 2015 conference on the farm next May. For two days, the public will learn about sustainable farming practices, listen to speakers, and attend workshops.

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NCBA says generic checkoff would fall short http://www.capitalpress.com/Livestock/20141017/ncba-says-generic-checkoff-would-fall-short http://www.capitalpress.com/Livestock/20141017/ncba-says-generic-checkoff-would-fall-short#Comments Fri, 17 Oct 2014 16:20:09 -0400 Carol Ryan Dumas http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014141019884 National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and its affiliate state cattlemen’s associations oppose any attempt by Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to “hijack” the producer-initiated, -passed and -supported beef checkoff by creating supplemental beef checkoff under a 1996 generic commodity promotion act.

The 1985 Beef Checkoff was specifically passed to address the needs and unique position of the beef industry, taking into account existing state beef councils and working with existing state and national organizations to promote beef and invest in research and education, Chase Adams, NCBA’s communications director, said on Tuesday.

He said the 1996 act is a generic commodity act that was never intended to supplement an existing checkoff. It was intended to provide the USDA a way to relatively quickly institute checkoffs for commodities that desired one, without having to go to Congress and craft legislation, he said.

Therefore, it is not tailored to the beef industry, it does not contemplate the checkoffs’ state and national structure through state beef councils and it places all the control over structure in the hands of the secretary of agriculture through rulemaking authority, he said.

The checkoff collects around $40 million a year.

NCBA says its comparison of the existing beef checkoff and a generic beef checkoff points out the strengths of the former and weaknesses of the latter.

It says the beef checkoff under the 1985 Beef Promotion and Research Act:

• Was developed by beef producers for beef producers to increase demand for beef.

• Recognizes and protects the role of qualified state beef councils and Federation of State Beef Councils.

• Limits government power.

•Caps administrative expenses at 5 percent.

• Directs secretary of agriculture to appoint only cattle producers and importers to the governing board.

• Requires importers to pay assessments on a per pound basis.

It claims th generic checkoff under the 1996 Commodity Promotion, Research and Information Act:

• Was developed by government to promote commodities like peanuts and sorghum for which no legislation exists.

• Does not assure the role of state beef councils or the Federation of State Beef Councils.

• Government power far less limited, with much more power given to the secretary of agriculture.

• Allows up to 15 percent in administrative and functioning expenses.

• Allows secretary of agriculture to appoint board members from general public, including anti animal-agriculture groups.

• Does not require importers to pay into the checkoff.

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