Capital Press | Nation/World http://www.capitalpress.com Capital Press Tue, 30 Sep 2014 23:10:24 -0400 en http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/staticimage/images/rss-logo.jpg Capital Press | Nation/World http://www.capitalpress.com Ag economy’s transition requires closer management http://www.capitalpress.com/Profit/20140930/ag-economys-transition-requires-closer-management http://www.capitalpress.com/Profit/20140930/ag-economys-transition-requires-closer-management#Comments Tue, 30 Sep 2014 14:46:25 -0400 Carol Ryan Dumas http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140939969 After a decade of wealth in the agricultural sector, particularly for grain growers, U.S. agriculture is in transition, a noted ag economist says.

And that demands awareness, planning and good management.

U.S. agriculture has enjoyed a great super cycle of wealth that has lasted two and a half times longer than previous super cycles of the past 100 years, said David Kohl, professor emeritus of agriculture and applied economics at Virginia Tech. and a 20-year partner in Northwest Farm Credit Services’ development program.

Global economies are in transition, and although agriculture didn’t participate in the 2008-2009 recession, it is now seeing cracks in the armor, particularly in the grains sector, he said during a webinar on agricultural trends on Sept. 25.

The components of the super cycle that began in 2003 are starting to change, beginning with the moderation of economic growth in both emerging and developed nations, he said.

Economic growth was on fire in emerging nations from 2002 through 2012, growing at an average of 8 percent annually. That growth has moderated to less than 5 percent annually, he said.

In addition, the EU is teetering on recession and it represents 25 percent of the world economy. The EU is China’s biggest customer, and loss of sales there will impact U.S. exports, he said.

Unrest in Russia and Ukraine, the bread basket of the EU and critical to energy transfer, could also effect markets and economies. The first place Russian President Vladimir Putin retaliated against U.S. sanctions was U.S. agriculture, he said.

China, the world’s second-largest economy, is another area to keep an eye on. The country’s economic growth rate has also slowed, its central bank is in trouble and it has serious natural resource issues. Half of the water in China is so nasty one can’t even wash clothes in it, 21 percent of its soils are toxic and it has major air pollution issues, he said.

China has been making strategic investments around the world but with its huge population, a shortage of food, energy and fiber would quickly lead to social discord, making the country a trade risk.

“Don’t bet the farm or ranch on trade with China,” Kohl said.

In addition, the U.S. dollar is strengthening, which doesn’t bode well for U.S. exports. And as foreign nations gain political and military clout, they will become tougher negotiators, he said.

Here at home, agriculture is facing a correction in land values, particularly in the Midwest and Upper Midwest, interest rates that are likely to rise, decreased wealth in the grain sector, and large capital investments in the livestock sector, he said.

Easy money’s been made in the grain sector, but the tide is changing. Now there’s good money to be made in the livestock sector, and the biggest mistakes are always made during profitable times, he said.

Good times can lead to complacency, greed, higher non–farm capital purchases, and a lack of attention to financials, best management practices, proper planning, and using measurements in decision making and performance review.

That has implications for grain growers coming off of good years and livestock producers gaining wealth, and Kohl cautions producers in both sectors to have a good grasp of their financials and cost structure and to use risk management tools.

He also advises growers to write down and review their goals, form an advisory team for their operation and to nurture their relationship with a lender who knows the producer’s business and goals and is consistent in good times and bad.

Kohl will present his insights on ag trends on Oct 28 in Great Falls, Mont.; Oct 29 in Kennewick, Wash.; and Oct. 30 in Salem, Ore. For more information, visit

https://www.northwestfcs.com/Resources/

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Wash. wheat farmer found GM plants in 2007 http://www.capitalpress.com/Nation_World/Nation/20140930/no-source http://www.capitalpress.com/Nation_World/Nation/20140930/no-source#Comments Tue, 30 Sep 2014 13:39:34 -0400 Mateusz Perkowski http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140939974 USDA’s investigation into an unauthorized biotech wheat release in Oregon last year found a Washington farmer who encountered wheat impervious to glyphosate herbicides in 2007.

While searching for the possible source of biotech wheat volunteers discovered by an Oregon grower last year, federal investigators interviewed more than 200 wheat farmers.

An unidentified grower in Washington told investigators that in the spring of 2007 he sprayed a patch of wheat volunteers with glyphosate three times but it remained unaffected by the herbicide.

The farmer ended up hand-pulling the 50 wheat plants — which were growing in a long narrow swath along a roadside ditch — and burned the material without sending it for genetic testing, the investigation summary said.

“He has not noticed any volunteers growing since 2007 and has not experienced any other issues with glyphosate-resistant wheat,” the report said, adding that USDA tested samples from his field without finding the genetically-modified “Roundup Ready” trait developed by the Monsanto Co.

The report said that investigators examined notifications from Monsanto for biotech wheat field trials between 1998 and 2004 and found “discrepancies” in the final trial reports, “including inconsistencies regarding the disposition of harvested material, the lack of monitoring for volunteers, and the method of devitalization or final disposition of plot areas.”

Investigators also examined internal Monsanto compliance reports for other field trials but were unable to find a link between these tests and the unauthorized release in Oregon.

Another incident mentioned in the report relates to 38 biotech wheat plants growing in pots at a Monsanto facility in 2003.

A scientist who was monitoring the plants discovered that 18 of the wheat heads were missing, which could contain roughly 1,000 seeds, the report said.

Monsanto and the USDA conducted investigations of the incident but couldn’t figure out what happened to the seeds. Federal officials decided there was “insufficient evidence to pursue administrative enforcement action against Monsanto,” the report said.

Despite these findings, the investigation wasn’t able to identify the source of the unauthorized release in Oregon, the report said.

The USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service said it’s stepping up monitoring of current and former field trial sites.

The agency plans to inspect all the biotech wheat field trial sites in 2014 to ensure volunteers are removed, as well as “strategically selected sites” from field tests that occurred in 2012 and 2013 in multiple states, Ed Curlett, director of public affairs for APHIS, said in an email.

The Center for Food Safety, which is critical of USDA biotech oversight, believes the enhanced inspections are “better than nothing” but don’t go farm enough.

“At this point, I think the suspension of these field trials is called for,” said Bill Freese, the non-profit’s science policy analyst.

Freese said the incident with the Washington farmer finding glyphosate-resistant wheat indicates the unauthorized release may not be limited to a single field in Oregon, as the USDA concluded.

“It’s very likely to have happened more frequently without us knowing it,” he said. “They seem to be unable to stop this from happening, even with one of the most economically important crops in America.”

The Monsanto Co. has issued a response to the investigation stating that full compliance with field trial rules is its top priority and the firm is continuously trying to improve its processes.

The Biotechnology Industry Organization called the USDA’s investigation “thorough” and reiterated the agency’s conclusion that the release was an isolated incident that did not affect the commercial wheat supply.

“This is good news for the U.S. wheat industry as it should have no effect on trade and brings closure to the matter,” said Cathleen Enright, BIO’s executive vice president for food and agriculture, in a statement.

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OSU will host farm succession workshops http://www.capitalpress.com/Oregon/20140930/osu-will-host-farm-succession-workshops http://www.capitalpress.com/Oregon/20140930/osu-will-host-farm-succession-workshops#Comments Tue, 30 Sep 2014 11:10:20 -0400 Eric Mortenson http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140939978 With 62 percent of Oregon’s principal farm operators over the age of 55, the state — and American agriculture in general — is entering a phase of extensive turnover.

Many family farms have no succession plans in place if the current owner retires, dies or is disabled. To help families plan, Oregon State University is holding a series of workshops this winter and spring in Salem, Redmond and Pendleton. Each workshop consists of two sessions, one in December and one in March. The sessions cost $325 per family; online registration is at http://business.oregonstate.edu/familybusinessonline/family-agricultural-enterprise-succession.

OSU Extension Economist Bart Eleveld, who heads the workshops, said family communication is key to succession planning, and the retiring farmer and the person designated to take over are required to attend the workshops.

“We don’t want the retiring or aspiring generation there by themselves,” he said. “What seems to be the hangup is the communication of who does what or when.”

According to background material prepared by OSU, large family farms carry an average value between $2.6 million and $4.3 million, and that value can be put at risk if the current owner dies unexpectedly or is disabled. In addition, farm assets or revenue diverted to retirement accounts may leave less for the next farm owner, and potential successors may leave the family operation if they’re forced to wait years before assuming control.

The Oregon’s Board of Agriculture, which advises the state ag department, has listed successful farm transition as one of its top 10 priorities.

The workshops will be held Dec. 2 and March 3 in Salem; Dec. 9 and March 10 in Redmond; and Dec. 10 and March 11 in Pendleton. The cost for both sessions includes meals, course notebooks and other material. Eleveld anticipates a minimum of 60 participants at each location. The workshops are put on by OSU’s Austin Family Business Program, which has formed an ag succession team to guide the project.

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Wheat groups to get compensation in GMO settlement http://www.capitalpress.com/Nation_World/Nation/20140930/wheat-groups-to-get-compensation-in-gmo-settlement http://www.capitalpress.com/Nation_World/Nation/20140930/wheat-groups-to-get-compensation-in-gmo-settlement#Comments Tue, 30 Sep 2014 11:04:27 -0400 Mateusz Perkowski http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140939979 Wheat industry groups will have some money coming their way under a pending lawsuit settlement between Monsanto and wheat farmers.

However, it remains unclear which groups will divvy up the cash.

Last year, several wheat farmers filed a legal complaint against the biotech developer, alleging it was negligent in an unauthorized release of genetically engineered wheat that temporarily disrupted trade with Japan and South Korea.

In September, soft white wheat growers involved in the lawsuit told a federal judge they’d reached a tentative deal with Monsanto.

They recently asked the judge for more time to hammer out the details before dismissing the case.

That motion mentioned that “the parties have agreed on an amount of money that will be donated to wheat-related industry groups but have not finalized exactly which groups will share this donation.”

Monsanto and the soft white wheat farmers should be able to complete the agreement by Oct. 20, the motion said.

However, the company has not yet reached a deal with non-soft white wheat growers.

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Food safety warnings aren’t a ‘taking,’ judge rules http://www.capitalpress.com/Nation_World/Nation/20140930/food-safety-warnings-arent-a-taking-judge-rules http://www.capitalpress.com/Nation_World/Nation/20140930/food-safety-warnings-arent-a-taking-judge-rules#Comments Tue, 30 Sep 2014 10:57:37 -0400 Mateusz Perkowski http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140939980 An incorrect government food safety warning that causes a crop’s value to plummet is not an unconstitutional “taking” without just compensation, a federal judge has ruled.

The ruling relates to a 2008 outbreak of salmonella, which the U.S. Food and Drug Administration initially blamed on tomatoes but later said was caused by hot peppers.

More than 20 farms and produce companies filed a complaint against the agency for destroying the value of their tomatoes when the market for the crop collapsed due to several FDA food safety warnings.

The plaintiffs claimed the FDA’s actions amounted to a “regulatory taking” of their tomatoes, as the warnings were intended to have a “coercive effect on the market.”

In their complaint, the 17 tomato growers involved in the lawsuit said the price drop collectively cost them more than $37.6 million — or roughly $2.2 million per operation.

Senior Judge Lynn Bush of the Court of Federal Claims has rejected the tomato companies’ arguments, finding that a mere warning can’t be considered an unconstitutional taking.

While there is no case law regarding consumer warnings, previous rulings that pertain to the real estate market indicate that government statements alone are not takings, she said.

For example, the Federal Aviation Administration made an advisory ruling that a proposed building would create a hazard to air navigation.

In that case, the FAA’s determination was not deemed a taking because the property’s owner could still construct the building — even though, in practical terms, the owner could no longer obtain the necessary financing or insurance.

“A regulatory takings claim is not plausible and cannot proceed when the government action at issue has no legal effect on the plaintiff’s property interest,” Bush said. “Advisory pronouncements, even those with significant financial impact on the marketplace, are not enough to effect a taking of property under the Fifth Amendment.”

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Another card system hack at Supervalu, Albertsons http://www.capitalpress.com/Business/20140930/another-card-system-hack-at-supervalu-albertsons http://www.capitalpress.com/Business/20140930/another-card-system-hack-at-supervalu-albertsons#Comments Tue, 30 Sep 2014 09:54:21 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140939983 NEW YORK (AP) — Card data of Supervalu and Albertsons shoppers may be at risk in another hack, the two supermarket companies said Monday.

The companies said that in late August or early September, malicious software was installed on networks that process credit and debit card transactions at some of their stores.

Albertsons said the malware may have captured data including account numbers, card expiration dates and the names of cardholders at stores in more than a dozen states. Supervalu said the malware was installed on a network that processes card transactions at several chains, but it believes data was only taken from certain checkout lanes at four Cub Foods stores in Minnesota.

The breach could affect Albertsons stores in California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming; Acme Markets stores in Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey and Pennsylvania; Jewel-Osco stores in Illinois, Indiana and Iowa; and Shaw’s and Star Markets stores in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont. The Boise, Idaho-based company has a total of 1,081 stores.

Supervalu Inc. said it believes the malware was only able to capture card data from some checkout lanes at four Cub Foods locations in Minnesota because it had not finished making security improvements at those stores. The company, which is based in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, said it thinks it has gotten rid of the malware.

The malware was also installed on a network that processes card transactions at Shop ‘n Save and Shoppers Food & Pharmacy stores as well as some stand-alone liquor stores, but the company thinks the malware did not capture payment card data from any stores except possibly for the four in Minnesota. Supervalu distributes food to about 1,800 independent stores, runs 1,325 stores under the Save-A-Lot name, and has 190 retail grocery stores under five different brand names, including Cub Foods.

Supervalu sold the Albertsons, Acme, Jewel-Osco, Shaw’s and Star Market chains to Cerberus Capital Management in 2013, but it still provides information technology services for those stores.

The companies also disclosed a data breach in August. They said the two incidents are separate. Supervalu said that incident may have affected as many as 200 grocery and liquor stores. It said hackers accessed a network that processes Supervalu transactions, with account numbers, expiration dates, card holder names and other information.

That breach occurred between June 22 and July 17, and Supervalu said it immediately began working to secure that portion of its network. The companies said Monday that they are still investigating that incident and don’t know if cardholder data was taken.

The latest breach follows big hacks that affected millions of customers at Home Depot, Target and other retailers over the past year.

Supervalu’s shares slipped 8 cents to $9.05 in extended trading Monday.

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Federal agency defends use of Ducks Unlimited employees http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20140930/federal-agency-defends-use-of-ducks-unlimited-employees http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20140930/federal-agency-defends-use-of-ducks-unlimited-employees#Comments Tue, 30 Sep 2014 09:32:09 -0400 BLAKE NICHOLSON http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140939985 BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The Natural Resources Conservation Service is defending its use of three Ducks Unlimited employees in North Dakota, saying the partnership aids the agency, taxpayers and landowners.

The federal government’s main conservation agency has been criticized by the North Dakota Grain Growers Association. The group, which represents North Dakota wheat and barley farmers, said last week that the relationship between NRCS and Ducks Unlimited could hurt farmers’ and ranchers’ pocketbooks if the nonprofit gains undue influence over decisions regarding private land use.

Ducks Unlimited, which works to boost wetlands and waterfowl, provides three field biologist positions to help NRCS with two federal programs — the Conservation Reserve Program and the Environmental Quality Incentives Program, NRCS told The Associated Press. Those three people make up fewer than 2 percent of the agency’s 200 office-level field staff in the state.

“Every dollar of federal funding for technical assistance work is matched by a dollar of DU funds,” the NRCS statement said. “This helps NRCS meet the large demand for conservation planning and project implementation.”

The agency also said Ducks Unlimited staff are supervised by NRCS officials and do not conduct wetland compliance checks. Producers who don’t comply with wetlands regulations can lose eligibility for federal farm programs.

Grain Growers Executive Director Dan Wogsland said he worries that Ducks Unlimited biologists might have “indirect influence” when questions of compliance arise.

“Farmers and ranchers deserve unbiased help and information from employees hired exclusively by the federal government and not by a political organization with an agenda,” he said.

Ducks Unlimited rejects the notion that it gains influence with NRCS, saying the field biologists are “not involved in any regulatory programs or policy development.”

The NRCS in South Dakota in recent years has used private consultants to help with a massive backlog in certified wetland determinations that help landowners know which areas they can drain.

South Dakota state Resource Conservationist Gerald Jasmer said he did not know if any of those consultants are affiliated with Ducks Unlimited.

“Our only interest is that the data we are provided is accurate, complete and of sufficient quality to be used by our NRCS wetland specialists to make a high-quality certified wetland determination,” he said.

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Portland daily grain report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140930/portland-daily-grain-report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140930/portland-daily-grain-report#Comments Tue, 30 Sep 2014 09:27:08 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140939987 Portland, Ore., Tuesday, Sept. 30

USDA Market News

Bids for grains delivered to Portland, Oregon during September by unit trains and barges, in dollars per bushel, except oats, corn and barley, in dollars per cwt. Bids for soft white wheat are for delivery periods as specified. Hard red winter wheat and dark northern spring wheat bids are for full September delivery. Bids for corn are for 30 day delivery.

In early trading December wheat futures trended seven to 9.50 cents per bushel lower than Monday’s closes.

Bids for US 1 Soft White Wheat for September delivery in unit trains or barges were not fully established in early trading but bids were indicated as lower compared to Monday’s noon bids for the same delivery period. The lower Chicago December wheat futures and a lower basis bid by some exporters supported cash bids. Some exporters are not issuing bids for nearby delivery.

Bids for 11.5 percent protein US 1 Hard Red Winter Wheat for September delivery were not fully established in early trading, but were indicated as lower compared to Monday’s noon bids for the same delivery period.

The lower Kansas City December wheat futures pressured cash bids. Some exporters are not issuing bids for nearby delivery.

Bids for 14 percent protein non-guaranteed US 1 Dark Northern Spring Wheat for September delivery were not fully established in early trading but were indicated as lower compared to Monday’s noon bids. The lower Minneapolis December wheat futures pressured cash bids. Some exporters are not issuing bids for nearby delivery.

Bids for US 2 Yellow Corn delivered to Portland and the Yakima Valley were not available.

All wheat bids in dollars per bushel

US 1 Soft White Wheat - delivered by Unit Trains and Barges

Sep mostly 6.5400, ranging 6.4775-6.6000

Oct 6.4775-6.6300

Nov 6.5775-6.6600

Dec 6.5775-6.6900

Jan 6.5125-6.7200

US 1 White Club Wheat - delivered by Unit Trains and Barges

Sep mostly 8.7900, ranging 8.6000-8.9775

Not fully established and limited.

US 1 Hard Red Winter Wheat - (Exporter bids-falling numbers of 300 or

better)

Ordinary protein 6.9500-7.0000

10 pct protein 6.9500-7.0000

11 pct protein 7.0300-7.0800

11.5 pct protein

Sep 7.0700-7.1200

12 pct protein 7.0700-7.1200

13 pct protein 7.0700-7.1200

Not fully established and limited.

US 1 Dark Northern Spring Wheat (with a minimum of 300 falling numbers, a maximum

of 0.5 part per million vomitoxin, and a maximum of one percent total damage)

13 pct protein 5.7225-6.8225

14 pct protein

Sep 7.3225-8.8225

15 pct protein 8.5225-10.0225

16 pct protein 9.7225-11.2225

Not fully established and limited.

US 2 Yellow Corn in dollars per CWT

Domestic-single rail cars

Delivered full coast-BN NA

Delivered to Portland NA

Rail and Truck del to Willamette Vly NA

Rail del to Yakima Valley NA

Truck del to Yakima Valley NA

US 2 Heavy White Oats in dollars per CWT 13.2500

Not well tested.

Exporter Bids Portland Rail/Barge Aug 2014

Averages in Dollars per bushel

US 1 Soft White by Unit Trains and Barges 6.8800

US 1 Hard Red Winter (Ordinary protein) 7.1500

US 1 Hard Red Winter (11.5% protein) 7.2700

US 1 Dark Northern Spring (14% protein) 7.9400

Source: USDA Market News Service, Portland, OR

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Conservation groups oppose Wyoming wolf management http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20140930/conservation-groups-oppose-wyoming-wolf-management http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20140930/conservation-groups-oppose-wyoming-wolf-management#Comments Tue, 30 Sep 2014 09:11:06 -0400 BEN NEARY http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140939990 CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Conservation groups are urging a federal judge not to allow the state of Wyoming to regain control of wolves.

The groups sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2012. They’re challenging the agency’s acceptance of Wyoming’s wolf management plan, which classifies wolves as predators that can be shot on sight in most areas.

“There’s a real disagreement between what the science of wolf management is and what the political decisions are that are being made,” Adrienne Maxwell, a Montana lawyer representing the conservation groups, said Monday.

U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson of Washington, D.C., last week entered an order returning wolves in Wyoming to federal control.

Jackson agreed with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that wolves in the Northern Rockies have recovered. And she accepted the agency’s finding that wolves aren’t endangered or threatened within a significant portion of their range.

But Jackson ruled the federal agency shouldn’t have accepted Wyoming’s nonbinding promise to maintain at least 100 wolves and 10 breeding pairs outside of Yellowstone and the Wind River Indian Reservation.

Wyoming moved fast last week to try to get Jackson to reverse the decision.

Republican Gov. Matt Mead’s administration last week pushed through an administrative rule that started the process of making the state’s wolf plan legally binding. The state then pointed to that new rule in asking Jackson to amend her decision.

Jackson has set a hearing for Tuesday to consider the state’s request and other matters.

The state told the judge it wanted to resolve the issue quickly because it has scheduled a wolf hunt starting Wednesday in a trophy-hunting zone bordering Yellowstone National Park. The state game commission has approved letting hunters kill up to 43 wolves in the hunting season. Public hunting is not allowed under federal management.

Mead emphasized last week that state management is working. He said the state had almost 190 wolves and 15 breeding pairs after the first hunting season in 2012 and just under 200 wolves and 15 breeding pairs after last year’s hunt.

“We’re managing wolves correctly,” Wyoming Attorney General Peter Michael said. “But part of managing wolves is you have to kill some of them.”

Lawyers for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Monday filed papers with Jackson saying they didn’t believe she needed to scrap state management entirely to address whether the state’s minimum population guarantee was binding. Lawyers for the Safari Club and other hunting groups also supported continued state management.

Maxwell said the state’s response to Jackson’s order doesn’t solve the problems with the state wolf management plan. She said the state and federal agency should craft a new plan.

The federal government reintroduced wolves in Yellowstone National Park in the 1990s. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service transferred wolf management to state control in Montana and Idaho years ago. Congress specified there could be no legal challenge to management plans in those states, which also allow hunting.

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Sagebrush habitat fuels $1 billion in recreation spending http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20140930/sagebrush-habitat-fuels-1-billion-in-recreation-spending http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20140930/sagebrush-habitat-fuels-1-billion-in-recreation-spending#Comments Tue, 30 Sep 2014 09:03:34 -0400 SCOTT SONNER http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140939991 RENO, Nev. (AP) — Advocates of protecting sage grouse habitat across the West say new research shows visitors to western federal rangelands with significant tracts of sagebrush pumped more than $1 billion into the economy last year.

The Pew Charitable Trusts says the study released Tuesday is the first of its kind to examine the direct and indirect economic impacts of recreation spending tied to U.S. Bureau of Land Management property with habitat for sagebrush-dependent species.

The report by ECONorthwest says hunters, campers, fishermen and others directly spent more than $623 million within 50 miles of relevant BLM property across more than 61 million acres in 11 states.

Idaho led the way with $126 million, followed by Nevada, $88 million; Wyoming $87 million; Oregon, $75 million; Colorado, $50 million; and Utah, $39 million.

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National wool and sheep report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140929/national-wool-and-sheep-report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140929/national-wool-and-sheep-report#Comments Mon, 29 Sep 2014 14:58:57 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140929858 Wool prices in cents per pound and foreign currency per kilogram, sheep prices in dollars per hundredweight (cwt.) except some replacement animals on per head basis as indicated.

NATIONAL WOOL REVIEW

(USDA Market News)

Greeley, Colo.

Sept. 26

Domestic wool trading on a clean basis was at a standstill this week. There were no confirmed trades this week. Demand good and trade activity moderate for this time of year. Domestic wool trading on a greasy basis was at a standstill this week. There were no confirmed trades this week.

Domestic wool tags

No. 1 $.60-.70

No. 2 $.50-.60

No. 3 $.40-.50

NATIONAL SHEEP SUMMARY

(USDA Market News)

San Angelo, Texas

Sept. 26

Compared to last week: Slaughter lambs were steady to $9 higher, instances $20-40 higher at New Holland, Pa. Slaughter ewes were mostly steady to $4 higher. Feeder lambs were uneven, mostly steady to $10 higher, except lambs under 70 lbs. at St. Onge, S.D., that were $10-15 lower. At San Angelo, Texas, 6,593 head sold in a one-day sale. Equity Electronic Auction sold 340 slaughter lambs in North Dakota. In direct trading slaughter ewes were not tested and feeder lambs were weak to $3 lower. 9,700 head of negotiated sales of slaughter lambs were $3-4 higher and 5,600 head of formula sales of carcasses under 55 lbs. were not well tested; 55-65 lbs. had higher undertones; 65-75 lbs. were $3-4 lower; 75-85 lbs. were $5-7 higher and over 85 lbs. were not well tested. 6,559 lamb carcasses sold with 55 lbs. and down $7.72-8.95 higher; 55-75 lbs. $1.25-2.51 higher and 75 lbs. and up $3.50-3.75 higher.

SLAUGHTER LAMBS Choice and Prime 2-3:

San Angelo: shorn and wooled 115-165 lbs. $150-170.

SLAUGHTER LAMBS Choice and Prime 1:

San Angelo: 40-60 lbs. $220-234; 60-70 lbs. $207-228, few $233-236; 70-80 lbs. $200-224; 80-90 lbs. $ 204-222; 90-105 lbs. $180-214, few $220.

DIRECT TRADING (Lambs with 3-4 percent shrink or equivalent):

9,700 Slaughter Lambs shorn and wooled 84-162 lbs. $150- 171.25 (wtd avg $159.86).

Washington: 500 Feeder Lambs 95-100 lbs. $190.

SLAUGHTER EWES:

San Angelo: Good 2-3 (fleshy) $65-75; Utility and Good 1-3 (medium flesh) $74-86, high-yielding $86-96; Utility 1-2 (thin) 64-74; Cull and Utility 1-2 (very thin) $50-63; Cull 1 (extremely thin) 25- 45.

FEEDER LAMBS Medium and Large 1-2:

San Angelo: 40 lbs. $224; 60-70 lbs. $210-218; 70-90 lbs. $200- 218; 90-100 lbs. $200-206.

REPLACEMENT EWES Medium and Large 1-2:

San Angelo: No test.

NATIONAL WEEKLY LAMB CARCASS Choice and Prime 1-4:

Weight Wtd. avg.

45 lbs. down $409.41

45-55 lbs. $376.12

55-65 lbs. $341.31

65-75 lbs. $331.27

75-85 lbs. $322.61

85 lbs. and up $309.31

Sheep and lamb slaughter under federal inspection for the week to date totaled 39,000 compared with 39,000 last week and 41,000 last year.

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Western hay reports http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140929/western-hay-reports http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140929/western-hay-reports#Comments Mon, 29 Sep 2014 14:55:16 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140929859 Hay prices are dollars per ton or dollars per bale when sold to retail outlets. Basis is current delivery FOB barn or stack, or delivered customer as indicated.

Grade guidelines used in this report have the following relationship to Relative Feed Value (RFV), Acid Detergent Fiber (ADF), TDN (Total Digestible Nutrients), or Crude Protein (CP) test numbers:

Grade RFV ADF TDN CP

Supreme 185+ <27 55.9+ 22+

Premium 170-185 27-29 54.5-55.9 20-22

Good 150-170 29-32 52.5-54.5 18-20

Fair 130-150 32-35 50.5-52.5 16-18

Utility <130 36+ <50.5 <16

WASHINGTON-OREGON HAY

(Columbia Basin)

(USDA Market News)

Moses Lake, Wash.

Sept. 26

This week FOB Last week Last year

10,495 11,260 5,755

Compared to Sept. 18: Alfalfa for domestic and export steady to $5 higher in a light test. Trade remains slow. Demand light to moderate as the feed supply in the trade area is abundant. Timothy for export was steady to firm. Good demand for green second cutting Timothy, light demand for brown stem or rained on Timothy. Retail/Feedstore hay steady. Buyer demand good with moderate supplies.

Tons Price

Alfalfa Large Square Supreme 500 $255

Prem./Sup. 560 $250

Good/Prem. 2000 $215

Fair/Good 1500 $217

60 $225

2400 $224.58

Alfalfa Small Square Premium 1500 $230-235

100 $250-270

Good/Prem. 100 $235-240

Fair/Good 50 $180

Orchard Grass Small Square Premium 225 $250-275

Timothy Grass Small Square Premium 1500 $220-240

OREGON AREA HAY

(USDA Market News)

Portland, Ore.

Sept. 26

This week FOB Last week Last year

3,618 10,116 7,370

Compared to Sept. 19: Hay prices were mixed depending on location with higher prices seen in Lake County and Eastern Oregon and all other locations steady to lower. There was a lighter volume of trade compared to last week with most farmers either in the process or finishing their third of fourth cutting depending on location.

Tons Price

CROOK, DESCHUTES, JEFFERSON, WASCO COUNTIES

Alfalfa Large Square Premium 100 $240

Small Square Premium 50 $240

Orchard Grass Small Square Premium 2 $190

108 $240-265

Meadow Grass Small Square Premium 25 $230

Grass Mix-Five Way Small Square Premium 20 $290

EASTERN OREGON

Alfalfa Large Square Supreme 345 $225-245

Good 500 $200

Small Square Good 200 $200

Alfalfa/Orchard Mix Small Square Premium 5 $185

Alfalfa/Grass Mix Large Square Premium 300 $190

Orchard Grass Small Square Premium 6 $190

Timothy Grass Small Square Premium 3 $190

Triticale Large Square Good 100 $135

KLAMATH BASIN

Prairie Grass Small Square Premium 25 $250

Barley Straw Small Square Fair 120 $70

LAKE COUNTY

Alfalfa Large Square Supreme 743 $250-260

Good/Prem. 100 $225

Good 3 $210

400 $200

Small Square Supreme 200 $265

200 $300

Alfalfa/Oat Mix Small Square Premium 30 $200

Good/Prem. 30 $175

Oat Large Square Premium 3 $150

HARNEY COUNTY: No new sales confirmed.

IDAHO HAY

(USDA Market News)

Moses Lake, Wash.

Sept. 26

This week FOB Last week Last year

5,700 4,600 2,137

Compared to Sept. 18: Alfalfa steady to $10 higher in a light test. Trade slow this week as buyers try to market higher testing fourth cutting. Demand good as more California buyers showed up in the market. Some interests are reporting there is one hay stack fire per week in the trade area. Retail/feed store/horse not tested this week.

Tons Price

Alfalfa Large Square Supreme 400 $230

Prem./Sup. 100 $200

Fair/Good 400 $180

1200 $200

3600 $200

CALIFORNIA HAY

(USDA Market News)

Moses Lake, Wash.

Sept. 26

This week FOB Last week Last year

7,675 11,800 17,371

Compared to Sept. 18: All classes trading mostly steady with a weaker undertone. Region 1 and 2 received some rain this week. Buyers want to buy hay cheaper and sellers are trying to keep prices up. Many producers are retaining the remainder of their hay for their own use or putting it into the hay shed hoping for better prices this winter. Demand light and trading activity slow.

REGION 1: North Inter-Mountain

Includes the counties of Siskiyou, Modoc, Shasta, Lassen and Plumas.

Tons Price

Alfalfa Premium 150 $275

300 $280

850 $310

25 $280

Good 300 $290

Alfalfa/Orchard Mix Premium 25 $300

Orchard Grass Premium 50 $320

Meadow Grass Premium 75 $260

REGION 2: Sacramento Valley

Includes the counties of Tehama, Glenn, Butte, Colusa, Sutter, Yuba, Sierra, Nevada, Placer, Yolo, El Dorado, Solano, Sacramento.

Tons Price

Alfalfa Supreme 350 $300-310

25 $350

Premium 150 $285

Good/Prem. 50 $270

Good 350 $260

50 $310

REGION 3: Northern San Joaquin Valley

Includes the counties of San Joaquin, Calaveras, Stanislaus, Tuolumne, Mono, Merced and Mariposa.

Tons Price

Alfalfa Supreme 400 $300

175 $335

Premium 275 $280-300

Good 550 $240-250

Fair 700 $215

Wheat Hay Good 200 $175

Sudan Good 250 $185

REGION 4: Central San Joaquin Valley: No new sales confirmed.

REGION 5: Southern California

Includes the counties of Kern, Northeast Los Angeles, and Western San Bernardino.

Tons Price

Alfalfa Prem./Sup. 325 $260-272

Premium 75 $255

175 $290

Utility 200 $205

175 $185

Orchard Grass Premium 100 $300

Forage Mix-Three Way Premium 75 $270

REGION 6: Southeast California

Includes the counties of Eastern San Bernardino, Riverside and Imperial.

Tons Price

Alfalfa Premium 250 $220

200 $220-225

Good 500 $200

Utility 300 $150

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West Coast grain reports http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140929/west-coast-grain-reports http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140929/west-coast-grain-reports#Comments Mon, 29 Sep 2014 14:46:12 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140929860 Grains are stated in dollars per bushel or hundredweight (cwt.) except feed grains traded in dollars per ton. National grain report bids are for rail delivery unless truck indicated.

PORTLAND GRAIN

(USDA Market News)

Portland

Sept. 26

PACIFIC NORTHWEST MARKET SUMMARY

Cash wheat bids for September delivery ended the reporting week on Thursday, Sept. 25, mixed as follows compared to last week’s September bids. Soft white wheat bids trended lower, dark northern spring wheat trended mixed, while hard red winter wheat bids moved higher.

December wheat futures ended the reporting week on Thursday, Sept. 25, lower as follows compared to Sept. 18 closes: Chicago 14.50 cents lower at $4.74, Kansas City 5.50 cents lower at $5.6425 and Minneapolis wheat futures trended 14 cents lower at $5.3625. Chicago December corn futures trended 12.25 cents lower at $3.26 while November soybean futures closed 48.75 cents lower at $9.2275.

Bids for U.S. 1 Soft White Wheat delivered to Portland in unit trains or barges during September were 10 to 19.50 cents per bushel lower, from $6.39-6.80, mostly $6.6175. Bids for Sept. 18 for September delivery were $6.5850-6.90, mostly $6.7150. White club wheat premiums for this week were $2 to $2.75, mostly $2.31 while the previous week’s premium was $2 to $2.50, mostly $2.17 over soft white wheat bids.

One year ago bids for U.S. 1 Soft White Wheat delivered by unit trains and barges to Portland for October delivery were $6.95-7.1550, mostly $7.07 and white club wheat was $7.4050-7.4550, mostly $7.4375. Nearby bids for U.S. 1 Soft White wheat began the reporting week on Sept. 19 at mostly $6.61 before rising higher to mostly $6.650 on Sept. 22, mostly $6.69 on Sept. 23 and mostly $6.7175 on Sept. 24. Sept. 25 the reporting week’s end bids moved lower to mostly $6.6175.

Some exporters were not issuing bids for nearby delivery. Forward month bids for soft white wheat were as follows: October $6.39-6.83, November $6.39-6.86, December $6.39-6.89 and January $6.4775-6.92. One year ago, forward month bids for soft white wheat were as follows: November and December $6.95-7.2050, January $7.1775-7.2575 and February $7.25-7.3075.

Bids for 11.5 percent protein U.S. 1 Hard Red Winter Wheat for September delivery trended from 4.50 to 14.50 cents per bushel higher compared to last week’s bids. Higher basis bids by some exporters were supportive to bids. On Thursday, bids were as follows: September $6.9425-7.1425, mostly $7.0625; October and November $7.0925-7.1925; December $7.0425-7.1925 and January $6.98-7.23.

Bids for non-guaranteed 14.0 percent protein U.S. 1 Dark Northern Spring Wheat for Portland delivery for full September delivery trended mixed, from 24 cents lower to 11 cents per bushel higher compared to the previous week’s bids. On Sept. 25, bids for non-guaranteed 14 percent protein were as follows: September $7.3625-8.8625, mostly $8.0325; October, November, and December $7.6625-8.8625 and January $7.8175-8.4675.

COARSE FEEDING GRAINS

Bids for U.S. 2 Yellow Corn delivered to Portland in single rail cars were not available. Bids for U.S. 2 Yellow Corn truck delivered to the inland feeding areas of Yakima, Wash., and Hermiston, Ore., were also not available. Bids for U.S. 2 Heavy White Oats for September delivery held steady at 280.

PACIFIC NORTHWEST EXPORT NEWS

There were 15 grain vessels in Columbia River ports on Thursday, September 25, with four docked compared to 13 on Sept. 18 with three docked. There were no new confirmed export sales from the Commodity Credit Corporation this week.

CALIFORNIA GRAINS

(USDA Market News)

Portland

Sept. 25

Prices in dollars per cwt., bulk Inc.= including; Nom.= nominal; Ltd.= limited; Ind.= indicated; NYE=Not fully estimated.

GRAIN DELIVERED

Mode Destination Price per cwt.

BARLEY - U.S. No. 2 (46-lbs. per bushel)

Truck Petaluma-Santa Rosa $11.20

Stockton-Modesto-Oakdale-Turlock $11.50

Fresno-Tulare-Corcoran-Coalinga NA

Colusa County NA

FOB Yolo County NA

FOB Glenn County NA

CORN - U.S. No. 2 Yellow

FOB Turlock $8.91

Rail Single Car Units via BNSF

Chino Valley-Los Angeles $9.66

Truck Petaluma-Santa Rosa 8.95

Stockton-Modesto-Oakdale-Turlock $9.21

Los Angeles-Chino Valley NA

Fresno-Tulare-Corcoran-Coalinga NA

Colusa County NA

SORGHUM - U.S. No. 2 Yellow

Rail Los Angeles-Chino Valley

via BNSF Single $9.71-9.75

OATS - U.S. No. 2 White

Truck Petaluma $15

Rail Petaluma $15

OATS - U.S. No. 1 White

Truck Los Angeles-Chino Valley $15.60

WHEAT - U.S. No. 2 or better - Hard Red Winter

(Domestic Values for Flour Milling)

Kings County 13 percent Protein NA

Los Angeles 12 percent Protein $13.54

Los Angeles 13 percent Protein $13.74

Los Angeles 14 percent Protein $13.94

Truck/Rail Los Angeles 11-12 percent Protein NA

Los Angeles 12 percent Protein $12.74

Los Angeles 13 percent Protein NA

Los Angeles 14 percent Protein NA

WHEAT - U.S. Durum Wheat

Truck Imperial County $21.80-22

WHEAT - Any Class for Feed

Truck Petaluma-Santa Rosa NA

Stockton-Modesto-Oakdale-Turlock NA

Merced County NA

Colusa County NA

Kern County NA

Truck/Rail Los Angeles-Chino Valley $12.25-13.50

Prices paid to California farmers, seven-day reporting period ending Sept. 25:

WHEAT, U.S. No. 1, Hard Amber Durum for Flour Milling

Kern $14.70 Spot FOB Ranch

Imperial $19 Spot Del Locally

Imperial $20 NC, Spot FOB Ranch

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California egg report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140929/california-egg-report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140929/california-egg-report#Comments Mon, 29 Sep 2014 14:40:44 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140929861 Shell egg marketer’s benchmark price for negotiated egg sales of USDA Grade AA and Grade AA in cartons, cents per dozen. This price does not reflect discounts or other contract terms.

DAILY CALIFORNIA SHELL EGGS

(USDA Market News)

Des Moines, Iowa

Sept. 25

Benchmark prices are steady. Asking prices for next week are 1 cent lower on Jumbo, 6 cents higher for Extra Large, 8 cents higher for Large and 14 cents higher for Medium and Small. The undertone is fully steady. Demand is moderate on light to moderate offerings. Supplies are light to moderate. Market activity is slow to moderate. Small benchmark price $1.07.

Size Range Size Range

Jumbo 160 Extra large 160

Large 148 Medium 127

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Prices to retailers, sales to volume buyers, USDA Grade AA and Grade AA, white eggs in cartons, delivered store door.

Size Range Size Range

Jumbo 142-154 Extra large 138-150

Large 125-136 Medium 107-115

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National slaughter, feeder and stocker cattle report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140929/national-slaughter-feeder-and-stocker-cattle-report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140929/national-slaughter-feeder-and-stocker-cattle-report#Comments Mon, 29 Sep 2014 14:38:09 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140929862 Cattle prices in dollars per hundredweight (cwt.) except some replacement animals per pair or head as indicated.

NATIONAL SLAUGHTER CATTLE

(Federal-State Market News)

Oklahoma City-Des Moines

Sept. 26

Compared to last week: No slaughter cattle trade reported so far this week. Boxed beef prices Sept. 26 averaged $231.82, which is $4.84 lower than Sept. 18. The Choice/Select spread is $12.75. Slaughter cattle on a national basis for negotiated cash trades through Sept. 26 totaled about 4,000 head. The previous week’s total head count was 52,629 head.

Slaughter Cows and Bulls (Average Yielding Prices): Slaughter cows steady to $2 lower. Slaughter bulls steady to firm.

USDA’s Cutter cow carcass cut-out value Sept. 26 was $234.31 down $.93 from Sept. 18.

NATIONAL FEEDER AND STOCKER CATTLE

(Federal-State Market News)

St. Joseph, Mo.

Sept. 26

This week Last week Last year

224,100 307,800 266,300

Compared to Sept. 19: Yearling feeder cattle sold fully steady to $3 higher. Yearling supplies remain tight in most areas and values remain constant. Calf prices were unevenly steady in most areas ranging from $5 higher to $5 lower. The biggest losses on calves were those weighing over 500 lbs. in most cases with gains more prevalent on lighter weight calves under 500 lbs. in the Southeast.

Despite the beginning of the fall season when temperatures can be volatile there were a good number of new crop calves in the offering this week. These unweaned calves can have a number of health issues as separation anxiety and shipping fever can take its toll on new purchases. But, where corn producing farmer-feeders are participants they have been active buyers. The Huss Platte Valley Auction in Kearney, Neb., on Sept. 24 sold 196 head of steer calves right off the cows weighing from 602-639 lbs. with an average weight of 623 lbs. sold for an average price of $273.57 per lb.

Feeder cattle prices continue in most cases to hold gains day after day when there seems to be a number of reasons why they shouldn’t. The feeder cattle market continues to show much strength when compared to the fat cattle market.

Boxed beef continues to retreat in prices this week as Choice Boxed Beef has traded lower 10 of the past 12 sessions to fall below $240 at $239.13 on Sept. 24, but with very good volume movement of 281 total loads.

When you look at the price of corn when compared to the last two years the talk about corn harvest is the record high yields. With lower corn prices ahead and in many areas falling well below $3/per bushel, cattle feeders have a tremendous incentive to feed cattle. Also, to feed slaughter cattle to heavier weights as this will likely continue to see heavier weights throughout the fall. Tight supplies and low feed cost should support price levels throughout the fall and winter.

At the Torrington, Wyo., Livestock Commission on Sept. 24 a 159 head of fancy black steers weighing 860 lbs. sold for $235.50/cwt. Live cattle futures on Friday made new highs for the week with October and November trading up the limit and the front three months of Feeder Cattle futures closing limit higher. Possibly looking at shortages to come in the future? The markets seem to be trying to decide if it’s bearish or bullish as both sides are looking at the facts and figures; which makes for a roller coaster ride. Feedlot trade remains inactive at this time as packers continue to try to buy cattle lower. This week’s reported auction volume included 47 percent over 600 lbs. and 39 percent heifers.

AUCTIONS

This week Last week Last year

185,100 191,500 213,800

WASHINGTON 3,200. 50 pct over 600 lbs. 36 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs. $276.08; 500-550 lbs. $253.42; 550-600 lbs. $247.14; Calves 600-650 lbs. $239.84; Calves 650-700 lbs. $235.40; 700-750 lbs. $219.92; 750-800 lbs. $216.78. Holsteins: Large 2-3 Pkg 603 lbs. $201. Heifers: Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs. $256.63; 500-550 lbs. $233.37; 550-600 lbs. $237.84; Calves 600-650 lbs. $228.47.

DIRECT

This week Last week Last year

26,900 36,700 35,800

SOUTHWEST (Arizona-California-Nevada) 3,200. No cattle over 600 lbs. No heifers. Holsteins: Large 3 January-February 300 lbs. $262 Del; February 325 lbs. $293.50 Del; 325 lbs. $296-299 FOB.

NORTHWEST (Washington-Oregon-Idaho) 5,500. 62 pct over 600 lbs. 45 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1-2 Current Delivery Delivered Price 550 lbs. $290 value added Washington-Idaho-Oregon. Current Delivery Delivered Price 875 lbs. $218 Idaho. Future Delivery FOB Price 650-700 lbs. $226-228 calves for October-November Washington; 800-900 lbs. $215-220 for October-November Idaho. Future Delivery Delivered Price 800-900 lbs. $216-222 October-November Idaho. Heifers: Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB Delivery 500 lbs. $282 value added Washington-Oregon-Idaho. Current Delivery Delivered Price 800-850 lbs. $215 Idaho. Future Delivery FOB Price 600-650 lbs. $218-220 calves for October-November Washington; 850 lbs. $209-210 for November Idaho. Future Delivery Delivered Price 850 lbs. $210 November Idaho.

NORTHWEST DIRECT CATTLE

(USDA Market News)

Moses Lake, Wash.

Sept. 26

This week Last week Last year

5,500 3,350 3,200

Compared to Sept. 18: Feeder calves less than 800 lbs. steady to weak. Feeder cattle over 800 lbs. steady to $3 higher. Trade moderate with good demand as feed prices continue to go lower and supplies are heavy. The feeder supply included 55 percent steers and 45 percent heifers. Near 62 percent of the supply weighed over 600 lbs. Prices are FOB weighing point with a 1-4 percent shrink or equivalent and with a 5-10 cent slide on calves and a 3-7 cent slide on yearlings. Delivered prices include freight, commissions and other expenses.

Steers: Medium and Large 1-2: Current FOB Delivery: 550 lbs. $290 value added Washington-Idaho-Oregon. Current Delivery Delivered Price: 875 lbs. $218 Idaho. Future Delivery FOB Price: 650-700 lbs. $226-228 calves for October-November Washington; 800-900 lbs. $215-220 for October-November Idaho. Future Delivery Delivered Price: 800-900 lbs. $216-222 October-November Idaho.

Heifers: Medium and Large 1-2: Current FOB Delivery: 500 lbs. $282 value added Washington-Oregon-Idaho. Current Delivery Delivered Price: 800-850 lbs. $215 Idaho. Future Delivery FOB Price: 600-650 lbs. $218-220 calves for October-November Washington; 850 lbs. $209-210 for November Idaho. Future Delivery Delivered Price: 850 lbs. $210 November Idaho.

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Selected Western livestock auctions http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140929/selected-western-livestock-auctions http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140929/selected-western-livestock-auctions#Comments Mon, 29 Sep 2014 14:24:48 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140929863 Cattle prices in dollars per hundredweight (cwt.) except some replacement animals per pair or head as indicated.

California

SHASTA

(Shasta Livestock Auction)

Cottonwood, Calif.

Sept. 26

Current week Last week

658 1,391

Compared to Sept. 19: Slaughter cows and bulls mostly steady. Very few cattle under 475 lbs., or over 700 lbs. today. Balance of steers steady to $3 higher, heifers $5-8 lower in small lots. Off lots and singles $20-40 below top offerings.

Slaughter cows: Breakers $101-109, $110-120 high dress; Boning $91-100; Cutters $80-90.

Bulls 1 and 2: $100-119; $120-129 high dress.

Feeder steers: 261-280; 550-600 lbs. $245-280; 600-650 lbs. $232-240; 650-700 lbs. $215-245.50; 700-750 lbs. $233; 800-900 lbs. $194-211.

Feeder heifers: 450-500 lbs. $220-240; 500-550 lbs. $230-240; 550-600 lbs. $205-224; 650-700 lbs. $200-220; 700-750 lbs. $205; 800-900 lbs. $192-193.50.

Calvy cows: Full Mouth $1700-2150; Broken mouth $1450-1700.

Pairs: Too few to test.

Idaho

CALDWELL

(Treasure Valley Livestock)

Sept. 19

Steers: 200-300 lbs. $298.75; 300-400 lbs. $292.25; 400-500 lbs. $199.25; 500-600 lbs. $230; 600-700 lbs. $193.75; 700-800 lbs. $168.75; 800-900 lbs. $158.25; 900-1000 lbs. $173.25; 1000 lbs. and up $139.

Heifers: 200-300 lbs. $318.75; 300-400 lbs. $252.75; 400-500 lbs. $223.75; 500-600 lbs. $210.50; 600-700 lbs. $183.75; 700-800 lbs. $173.50; 800-900 lbs. $178.75; 900-1000 lbs. $154; 1000 lbs. and up $105.

Cows (wt.): 800-900 lbs. $78.50; 900-1000 lbs. $99.25; 1000-1100 lbs. $92; 1100-1200 lbs. $95; 1200-1300 lbs. $97.75; 1300-1400 lbs. $105; 1400-1500 lbs. $150.25; 1500-1600 lbs. $106.50; 1600-1700 lbs. $105.75; 1700-1800 lbs. $110.

Bull calves (wt.): 200-300 lbs. $267.50; 300-400 lbs. $305; 400-500 lbs. $195.75; 500-600 lbs. $251.25; 600-700 lbs. $174.25; 700-800 lbs. $176.75; 1100-1200 lbs. $111; 1200-1300 lbs. $128; 1400-1500 lbs. $117.50.

Bulls (wt.): 1900-2000 lbs. $133.50; 2100-2200 lbs. $133; 2200-2400 lbs. $124.

Pairs (hd.): 1000 lbs. and up $2800.

Bred heifers (hd.): 800 lbs. and up $1425.

Stock cows (hd.): 800 lbs. and up $960.

Bull calves (hd.): 100-200 lbs. $550; 200-300 lbs. $685; 300-400 lbs. $400.

Heifer calves (hd.): 100-200 lbs. $375; 200-300 lbs. $655; 300-400 lbs. $650.

Steer calves (hd.): 100-200 lbs. $115; 200-300 lbs. $620; 300-400 lbs. $740; 400-500 lbs. $240.

Washington

TOPPENISH

(Toppenish Livestock Auction)

(USDA Market News)

Moses Lake, Wash.

Sept. 19

This week Last week Last year

2,010 1,800 1,675

Compared to Sept. 19 at the same market: Feeder steers steady to firm. Stocker and feeder heifers steady to weak. Trade active with good demand. Slaughter cows $2-3 lower. Slaughter bulls steady. Trade active with very good demand. Slaughter cows 60 percent, Slaughter bulls 10 percent, and feeders 30 percent of the supply. The feeder supply included 62 percent steers and 38 percent heifers. Near 50 percent of the run weighed over 600 lbs.

Feeder Steers: Medium and Large 1-2: 400-500 lbs. $270-280; 500-600 lbs. $240-251.50; 500-600 lbs. $254, Thin Fleshed; 600-700 lbs. $230-241.50, Calves; 600-700 lbs. $227, Full; 600-700 lbs. $247, Thin Fleshed; 700-800 lbs. $214-219; 700-800 lbs. $230, Thin Fleshed; 800-900 lbs. $199-203; 800-900 lbs. $181, Full. Large 1-2: 1100-1200 lbs. $161. Small and Medium 1-2: 400-500 lbs. $245-252.50; 600-700 lbs. $220.

Feeder Holstein Steers: Large 2-3: 200-300 lbs. $525, Per Head; 500-600 lbs. $192.50-211; 600-700 lbs. $201; 1300-1400 lbs. $122.50.

Feeder Heifers: Medium and Large 1-2: 400-500 lbs. $240-248; 400-500 lbs. $264, Thin Fleshed; 500-600 lbs. $235-239.50; 500-600 lbs. $244.50-253, Thin Fleshed; 600-700 lbs. $225-230, Calves; 600-700 lbs. $218, Full; 700-800 lbs. $203-211; 800-900 lbs. $192-195; 800-900 lbs. $186, Full. Large 1-2: 900-1000 lbs. $185. Small and Medium 1-2: 500-600 lbs. $227.50-230.

Slaughter Cows:

Boning 80-85 1100-1900 lbs. $107-113; Lean 85-90 1100-1700 lbs. $105-111; Lean 90 1100-1300 lbs. $92-96.

Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade 1-2 1500-2500 lbs. $130-140.50,

Bred Heifers (Per Head): Medium and Large 1-2: 1125 lbs. $2225 1-3 mos. bred.

Oregon

VALE

(Producers Livestock Market)

Sept. 24

Total receipts: 1,586 head.

Market comment: Higher market on the light 300, 400 and 500 weight calves. Somewhat cheaper on the 600 and 700 weight heavy weaned calves.

Steer calves: 300-400 lbs. $338-363; 400-500 lbs. $280-329; 500-600 lbs. $241-285.

Heifer calves: 300-400 lbs. $303-338; 400-500 lbs. $248-293; 500-600 lbs. $239-257.

Yearling steers : 600-700 lbs. $219-246; 700-800 lbs. $216-240; 800-900 lbs. $109-117; 900-1000 lbs. $186-201.

Yearling heifers: 600-700 lbs. $211-236; 700-800 lbs. $214-229

Stock cows (young): $118-134.

Stock cows (B.M.): $1275-1600.

Butcher cows: $97-113.

Thin shelly cows: $88-121.

Butcher bulls: $98-132.

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Ag helps fuel Idaho&#x2019;s economic growth http://www.capitalpress.com/Idaho/20140929/ag-helps-fuel-idahos-economic-growth http://www.capitalpress.com/Idaho/20140929/ag-helps-fuel-idahos-economic-growth#Comments Mon, 29 Sep 2014 10:44:19 -0400 Sean Ellis http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140929869 BOISE — Idaho’s gross product grew at one of the fastest rates in the nation last year and a stellar performance by agriculture was a major factor.

Idaho’s gross state product, adjusted for inflation, grew by 4.1 percent to $57 billion last year, the fifth highest increase among the 50 states.

GSP — the value of all goods and services produced — grew faster in Idaho’s 33 rural counties than it did in the state’s 11 metropolitan counties.

According to estimates by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, gross product rose 4.9 percent in the state’s rural counties and 3.7 percent in metropolitan areas.

Nationally, gross domestic product in rural areas increased 2.2 percent last year and it rose 1.7 percent in metropolitan areas.

Idaho Department of Labor and University of Idaho economists said it’s fair to attribute the growth in rural Idaho to a strong performance from the state’s agricultural sector.

Gross product from the state’s agricultural sector rose from $2.68 billion in 2012 to $3.09 billion in 2013, a 15.4 percent gain, by far the highest of any sector.

Food and beverage manufacturing increased 7.6 percent compared with 2012, to $1.8 billion.

“It’s production agriculture that’s pushing (the gross product growth in rural Idaho),” University of Idaho ag economist Garth Taylor said. “Agriculture is not a dinosaur. It’s not dying.”

Agriculture underpins most of the state’s rural areas and the gross product growth in those counties can be directly attributed to agriculture, which supports numerous other sectors of the economy, said Dan Cravens, a regional IDL economist in Southeast Idaho.

Cravens’ area of coverage includes heavily agricultural counties such as Bingham, Power, Oneida and Franklin.

“Agriculture and ag manufacturing really form the backbone of those rural counties,” he said. “When agriculture has a good year, positive things happen in those areas.”

Agriculture’s share of Idaho’s total gross product rose from 4.9 percent in 2012 to 5.4 percent in 2013, the largest gain as a share of total GSP of any economic sector.

Shelley farmer Stan Searle wasn’t surprised by the data.

“It was a good farming year last year,” he said. “The balance sheets on most farms should have gone up. There really wasn’t an industry that didn’t see some good marketing prices….”

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Michigan woman&#x2019;s service dog detects gluten http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20140929/michigan-womans-service-dog-detects-gluten http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20140929/michigan-womans-service-dog-detects-gluten#Comments Mon, 29 Sep 2014 09:45:21 -0400 LOUISE KNOTT AHERNLansing State Journal http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140929871 GREGORY, Mich. (AP) — Last Christmas Eve, Dawn Scheu set a bag of groceries on the floor of the kitchen in her Gregory home and got busy putting them away.

Her dog immediately started pawing at the back of her legs, according to the Lansing State Journal.

“Willow, quit,” Scheu admonished the German shorthaired pointer. From the other room, her husband yelled: “Is she indicating?”

Scheu froze. Is that what was going on? Was her service dog warning her that something in her grocery bag contained gluten?

Scheu, who suffers from celiac disease, called Willow back into the kitchen and ordered her to check. Once again, Willow began to paw — this time at a bag that Scheu thought contained gluten-free chips. But the bag Scheu had grabbed in a hurry actually contained crackers packed with gluten.

It was the first time — but not the last — that Willow saved Scheu from ingesting a substance that could make her sick for weeks or, in large-enough quantities, potentially kill her.

Willow is one of just a handful of service dogs in the United States trained to detect gluten — a protein found in grains such as wheat, barley and rye.

Before Willow, Scheu said she felt trapped in her own home, so afraid of cross-contamination that everyone and everything seemed like a threat.

Now, Scheu takes Willow everywhere — to the grocery store, on vacation, to restaurants.

“My husband and I went out to dinner for our anniversary,” Scheu said. “Willow came with us. It was the first time in four years I’ve been able to eat out.”

Gluten-free diets have become almost common in recent years as more people abandon grains and carbohydrates for less-processed fare.

Sales of gluten-free foods reached $4.2 billion in 2012, according to a survey by a marketing research firm called Packaged Facts. That number is expected to continue to grow to more than $6.6 billion by 2017.

Studies vary on how many people actually need to cut gluten from their diets for health reasons. But for the less than 1 percent of Americans with celiac disease — an autoimmune disorder that causes gluten to damage the small intestine and interfere with the absorption of nutrients — avoiding gluten is not just a lifestyle choice. It’s a medical necessity.

Scheu began experiencing symptoms of gluten intolerance nearly a decade ago. They got progressively worse. She lost so much weight that she dropped below 100 pounds.

Doctors suspected irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s disease and even colon cancer until finally diagnosing her with celiac four years ago.

By then, doctors told her if they didn’t get the disease under control, she had just three to five years to live.

Surviving with celiac is not just a matter of cutting out grains, Scheu said. Scheu’s sensitivity is so severe that she can get sick just from eating food that was cooked on the same grill as something containing gluten.

“Gluten is in everything,” she said. “When I’m out in public, I can’t even touch my mouth because it might be contaminated.”

In August last year, Scheu — who once trained search and rescue dogs — adopted a 10-week-old German shorthaired puppy and named her Willow.

And that’s when she started thinking.

Could a puppy be trained to detect gluten?

Scheu said she called several service dog trainers in search of someone who would give it a try but none was willing.

Then, she met Kathryn Watters, a FEMA-certified master dog trainer from Brighton. Watters was willing to see if it would work and almost immediately started training Willow.

Willow almost immediately responded.

Willow picks up gluten in things Scheu never would have suspected, she said. More than two months ago, for example, Scheu doused herself with bug spray. Willow immediately started pawing at her.

Scheu had no idea the bug spray contained gluten. She immediately jumped in the shower to wash it off, but she’s still recovering from the contamination, she said.

She wonders how worse it would have been without Willow to warn her.

Willow has been such a success that Watters and Scheu decided they wanted to help others.

Together, they’ve launched a business called Nosey Dog-Detection Partners Inc. to train other gluten-detecting dogs. They also offer their own dogs to “sweep” restaurants or other locations for people who worry about contamination.

Watters said they’re also training a dog who can detect peanuts for children who have severe peanut allergies, as well as a dog that can detect sugar levels in diabetics.

They’ve already fielded requests from around the country, Watters said.

Scheu said she wants people to know that while a service dog can’t fix everything — celiac sufferers still need to pay close attention to what they eat, diabetics still need to take responsibility for their own health — dogs like Willow are an extra level of protection.

“Willow has given me back my life,” she said.

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Portland daily grain report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140929/portland-daily-grain-report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140929/portland-daily-grain-report#Comments Mon, 29 Sep 2014 09:42:24 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140929872 Portland, Ore., Monday, Sep 29

USDA Market News

Bids for grains delivered to Portland, Oregon during September by unit trains and barges, in dollars per bushel, except oats, corn and barley, in dollars per cwt. Bids for soft white wheat are for delivery periods as specified. Hard red winter wheat and dark northern spring wheat bids are for full September delivery. Bids for corn are for 30 day delivery.

In early trading December wheat futures trended mixed, from 2.75 cents lower to two cents per bushel higher than Friday’s closes, with the most decline in Kansas City and the advance in Chicago.

Bids for US 1 Soft White Wheat for September delivery in unit trains or barges were not fully established in early trading but bids were indicated as higher compared to Friday’s noon bids for the same delivery period. The higher Chicago December wheat futures and a higher basis bid by some exporters supported cash bids. Some exporters are not issuing bids for nearby delivery.

Bids for 11.5 percent protein US 1 Hard Red Winter Wheat for September delivery were not fully established in early trading, but were indicated as lower compared to Friday’s noon bids for the same delivery period.

The lower Kansas City December wheat futures pressured cash bids. Some exporters are not issuing bids for nearby delivery.

Bids for 14 percent protein non-guaranteed US 1 Dark Northern Spring Wheat for September delivery were not fully established in early trading but were indicated as lower compared to Friday’s noon bids. The lower Minneapolis December wheat futures pressured cash bids. Some exporters are not issuing bids for nearby delivery.

Bids for US 2 Yellow Corn delivered to Portland and the Yakima Valley were not available.

All wheat bids in dollars per bushel

US 1 Soft White Wheat - delivered by Unit Trains and Barges

Sep mostly 6.6075, ranging 6.5125-6.7125

Oct 6.5125-6.7125

Nov 6.5625-6.7125

Dec 6.5625-6.7125

Jan 6.5375-6.7200

US 1 White Club Wheat - delivered by Unit Trains and Barges

Sep mostly 8.7750, ranging 8.6000-9.0125

Not fully established and limited.

US 1 Hard Red Winter Wheat - (Exporter bids-falling numbers of 300 or better)

Ordinary protein 6.9400-7.0400

10 pct protein 6.9400-7.0400

11 pct protein 7.0200-7.1200

11.5 pct protein

Sep 7.0600-7.1600

12 pct protein 7.0600-7.1600

13 pct protein 7.0600-7.1600

Not fully established and limited.

US 1 Dark Northern Spring Wheat (with a minimum of 300 falling numbers, a maximum

of 0.5 part per million vomitoxin, and a maximum of one percent total damage)

13 pct protein 5.7225-6.8225

14 pct protein

Sep 7.3225-8.8225

15 pct protein 8.5225-10.0225

16 pct protein 9.7225-11.2225

Not fully established and limited.

US 2 Yellow Corn in dollars per CWT

Domestic-single rail cars

Delivered full coast-BN NA

Delivered to Portland NA

Rail and Truck del to Willamette Vly NA

Rail del to Yakima Valley NA

Truck del to Yakima Valley NA

US 2 Heavy White Oats in dollars per CWT 13.2500

Not well tested.

Exporter Bids Portland Rail/Barge Aug 2014

Averages in Dollars per bushel

US 1 Soft White by Unit Trains and Barges 6.8800

US 1 Hard Red Winter (Ordinary protein) 7.1500

US 1 Hard Red Winter (11.5% protein) 7.2700

US 1 Dark Northern Spring (14% protein) 7.9400

Source: USDA Market News Service, Portland, OR

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EPA releases &#x2018;Salmon Mapper&#x2019; for 12 pesticides http://www.capitalpress.com/Nation_World/Nation/20140926/epa-releases-salmon-mapper-for-12-pesticides http://www.capitalpress.com/Nation_World/Nation/20140926/epa-releases-salmon-mapper-for-12-pesticides#Comments Fri, 26 Sep 2014 17:08:12 -0400 MITCH LIES http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140929876 The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Sept. 26 released a mapping system showing where no-spray buffer zones apply in California, Oregon and Washington for 12 pesticides.

The system, called “Salmon Mapper,” includes the most recent data depicting salmon supporting streams, according to an EPA news release.

A U.S. District Court in Washington in August issued an injunction reinstating 2004 court-ordered buffers for carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, malathion and methomyl of 60 feet for ground applications and 300 feet for air applications around salmon-bearing streams.

The buffers for these five active ingredients will remain in place until EPA implements “any necessary protections for Pacific salmon and steelhead based on reinitiated consultations with the National Marine Fisheries Service,” according to the release.

In contrast, buffers zones for 1,3-D, bromoxynil, diflubenzuron, propargite, metolachlor, prometryn and fenbutatin oxide will remain in effect until NMFS completes biological opinions for them.

Once EPA receives the biological opinion for a chemical, it is expected that the chemical will no longer be subject to the buffers and be removed from Salmon Mapper, according to Rose Kachadoorian, pesticide regulatory leader with the Oregon Department of Agriculture.

EPA is expecting a final biological opinion from NMFS for diflubenzuron, propargite and fenbutatin oxide in December, Kachadoorian said.

Biological opinions for carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, malathion and methomyl aren’t expected until 2017 at the earliest. They will be nationwide and for aquatic and terrestrial threatened and endangered species, according to Kachadoorian.

Online

Go to Salmon Mapper: http://www2.epa.gov/endangered-species/salmon-mapper

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Unauthorized GMO wheat in Montana http://www.capitalpress.com/Oregon/20140926/unauthorized-gmo-wheat-found-in-montana http://www.capitalpress.com/Oregon/20140926/unauthorized-gmo-wheat-found-in-montana#Comments Fri, 26 Sep 2014 11:06:33 -0400 Mateusz Perkowski http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140929881 Unauthorized biotech wheat was found growing this summer in Montana but it’s not the source of an earlier unauthorized release in Oregon, according to USDA.

Several acres of wheat volunteers genetically engineered by the Monsanto Co. to withstand glyphosate herbicides were found growing at a Montana State University research center in July, an agency official said Friday.

The site was used for field trials of “Roundup Ready” wheat between 2000 and 2003, said Bernadette Juarez, director of investigative and enforcement services at USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The “Roundup Ready” genetic trait is the same as the one discovered by an Eastern Oregon farmer in the spring of 2013, but the wheat is otherwise genetically different, she said. The agency has closed its investigation into that incident without reaching firm conclusions as to its source.

The Oregon biotech wheat volunteers were not found near a previous field trial site and show genetic characteristics associated with a wheat breeding program, Juarez said.

Biotech wheat at MSU’s Southern Agricultural Research Center near Huntley, Mont., is less genetically diverse, she said. Its discovery was similar, however: a field was sprayed with glyphosate but the volunteers persisted.

Juarez said the agency has launched an investigation into the Montana incident but isn’t ready to say whether the biotech wheat volunteers are the offspring of several generations of the crop that repeatedly sprouted for more than a decade after the field trials.

The volunteers were growing on several acres but at a low density, she said. The acreage is smaller than in Oregon, where the biotech wheat grew on a portion of the farmer’s 125-acre field.

Because the Montana incident occurred at the site of a previous field trial, the USDA does not expect that foreign wheat buyers will stop imports of U.S. wheat, said Juarez.

In 2013, exports to Japan and South Korea were temporarily halted until a genetic testing protocol was established to screen for genetically engineered wheat.

“We remain confident wheat exports will continue without disruption,” she said.

The investigation into the unauthorized release in Oregon has ended without any determinations about the source of the biotech wheat, though USDA continues to believe it was an isolated incident and none of the crop entered commerce.

Testing has not found any genetically engineered traits in the U.S. wheat supply, Juarez said.

Investigators from APHIS followed numerous leads and were able to rule out several possible sources for the escape, she said. Their investigation generated about 13,000 pages of paperwork, which will be released to the public with names and other personal information redacted.

No enforcement action against Monsanto or any other party will be taken in connection with the Oregon incident, Juarez said.

The agency will be examining other field trial sites in multiple states and reviewing its policies for keeping biotech crops contained, she said.

The Center for Food Safety, a non-profit group that’s critical of the USDA’s biotech oversight, sees the new discovery in Montana as “alarming,” said George Kimbrell, an attorney for the group.

“I don’t know if it’s worse or better if they’re unrelated,” he said. “It indicates either two escapes or a bigger escape.”

Michelle Hennings, executive director of the Washington Association of Wheat Growers, said a backlash to the Montana incident among foreign wheat buyers is unlikely due to the ongoing genetic testing protocols.

“I don’t think there is going to be a reaction,” she said.

Blake Rowe, CEO of the Oregon Wheat Commission, said the wheat industry is ready to “turn the page” on the Oregon incident even though the source of the biotech wheat wasn't identified.

“We were hopeful but not surprised they couldn't figure it out,” he said.

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Portland daily grain report http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140926/portland-daily-grain-report/1 http://www.capitalpress.com/Markets/20140926/portland-daily-grain-report/1#Comments Fri, 26 Sep 2014 12:20:23 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140929879 Portland, Ore., Friday, Sept. 26

USDA Market News

Bids for grains delivered to Portland, Oregon during September by unit trains and barges, in dollars per bushel, except oats and corn, in dollars per cwt. Bids for soft white wheat are for delivery periods as specified. Hard red winter wheat and dark northern spring wheat bids are for full September delivery. Bids for corn are for 30 day delivery.

December wheat futures closed mixed, from 3.00 lower to a 0.25 of a cent per bushel higher than Thursday’s closes, with the most decline in Minneapolis and the advance in Chicago.

Bids for US 1 Soft White Wheat delivered to Portland in unit trains and barges during September trended mixed, from 10.75 cents lower to a 0.25 of a cent per bushel higher compared to Thursday’s noon bids. Lower basis bid by some exporters pressured bids, while fractionally higher Chicago December wheat futures were supportive to bids. Some exporters are not issuing bids for nearby delivery.

Bids for 11.5 percent protein US 1 Hard Red Winter Wheat for September delivery trended 4.50 to 14.50 cents per bushel higher than Thursday’s noon bids. A higher basis bid by several exporters supported bids. Some exporters are not issuing bids for nearby delivery.

Bids for 14 percent protein US 1 Dark Northern Spring Wheat for September delivery trended 3.00 cents per bushel lower than Thursday’s noon bids for September delivery in lining up with the lower Minneapolis December wheat futures. Some exporters are not issuing bids for nearby delivery.

Bids for US 2 Yellow Corn delivered to Portland and the Yakima Valley were not available.

All wheat bids in dollars per bushel

US 1 Soft White Wheat - delivered by Unit Trains and Barges

Sep mostly 6.5450, ranging 6.3925-6.6925 up 0.25-dn 10.75

Oct 6.3925-6.6925 up 0.25-dn 13.75

Nov 6.3925-6.6925 up 0.25-dn 16.75

Dec 6.3925-6.6925 up 0.25-dn 19.75

Jan 6.4750-6.6950 dn 0.25-22.50

US 1 White Club Wheat - delivered by Unit Trains and Barges

Sep mostly 8.8575, ranging 8.6000-9.1425 dn 9.00-up 0.25

US 1 Hard Red Winter Wheat - (Exporter bids-falling numbers of 300 or

better)

Ordinary protein mostly 6.9475, ranging 6.9675-7.0675 up 14.50-4.50

10 pct protein mostly 6.9475, ranging 6.9675-7.0675 up 14.50-4.50

11 pct protein 7.0475-7.1475 up 14.50-4.50

11.5 pct protein

Sep mostly 7.0675, ranging 7.0875-7.1875 up 14.50-4.50

Oct 7.0875-7.1875 dn 0.50

Nov 7.0875-7.1875 dn 0.50

Dec 7.0375-7.1875 dn 0.50

Jan 6.9700-7.1200 dn 1.00-11.00

12 pct protein 7.0875-7.1875 up 14.50-4.50

13 pct protein mostly 7.0675, ranging 7.0875-7.1875 up 14.50-4.50

US 1 Dark Northern Spring Wheat (with a minimum of 300 falling numbers, a maximum

of 0.5 part per million vomitoxin, and a maximum of one percent total damage)

13 pct protein 5.7325-6.8325 dn 3.00

14 pct protein

Sep mostly 8.0025, ranging 7.3325-8.8325 dn 3.00

Oct 7.6325-8.8325 dn 3.00

Nov 7.6325-8.8325 dn 3.00

Dec 7.6325-8.8325 dn 3.00

Jan 7.7875-8.4375 dn 3.00

15 pct protein 8.5325-10.0325 dn 3.00

16 pct protein 9.7325-11.2325 dn 3.00

US 2 Yellow Corn in dollars per CWT

Domestic-single rail cars

Delivered full coast-BN NA

Delivered to Portland NA

Rail and Truck del to Willamette Vly NA

Rail del to Yakima Valley NA

Truck del to Yakima Valley NA

US 2 Heavy White Oats in dollars per CWT 13.5000 dn 50

Not well tested.

Exporter Bids Portland Rail/Barge Aug 2014

Averages in Dollars per bushel

US 1 Soft White by Unit Trains and Barges 6.8800

US 1 Hard Red Winter (Ordinary protein) 7.1500

US 1 Hard Red Winter (11.5% protein) 7.2700

US 1 Dark Northern Spring (14% protein) 7.9400

Source: USDA Market News Service, Portland, OR

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Chiquita, Fyffes alter merger agreement http://www.capitalpress.com/Business/20140926/chiquita-fyffes-alter-merger-agreement http://www.capitalpress.com/Business/20140926/chiquita-fyffes-alter-merger-agreement#Comments Fri, 26 Sep 2014 10:51:07 -0400 The http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140929882 Changes to the proposed merger between Chiquita and the Irish fruit importer Fyffes will give Chiquita shareholders a larger stake in what would become the world’s largest banana supplier.

The companies said Friday that shareholders of Chiquita Brands International Inc. will own nearly a 60 percent stake in the combined company under the revised all-stock deal, up from about 51 percent. Fyffes PLC shareholders will see their stake drop to about 40 percent, from more than 49 percent.

The boards of both companies have approved the revised deal, but shareholders still have to vote on it.

Chiquita and Fyffes announced their agreement last March. The new company will be incorporated in Dublin, where Fyffes is headquartered. Chiquita is based in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Chiquita and Fyffes said last week that they may make some concessions in their agreement to ensure that it is approved by European regulators. Fyffes spokesman Seamus Keenan said the deal revision announced Friday had nothing to do with that.

He also said the revision was not motivated by new regulations announced this week by the U.S. Treasury Department that are designed to make overseas maneuvers like the Chiquita-Fyffes deal less lucrative.

Under a so-called “inversion,” a U.S. business will reincorporate in another country after combining with a foreign company. It is then possible to lower the U.S. tax rate of the company.

The practice has become a hot-button issue. Critics, including high-ranking lawmakers, have said that inversions create a heavier tax burden for others.

Keenan said in an email the merger “is not a tax based or driven transaction.”

The companies also said Friday that they’ve agreed to increase the breakup fee Fyffes is paid if the deal is not completed.

Chiquita is still talking with two Brazilian companies that have offered to buy the U.S. banana company for $611 million. Chiquita said earlier this month that it would open its books to the investment firm Safra Group and the juice company Cutrale Group.

Chiquita shares closed at $14 on Thursday and have climbed nearly 20 percent so far this year.

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Worrisome weed could threaten Upper Midwest crops http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20140926/worrisome-weed-could-threaten-upper-midwest-crops http://www.capitalpress.com/AP_Nation_World/20140926/worrisome-weed-could-threaten-upper-midwest-crops#Comments Fri, 26 Sep 2014 10:34:36 -0400 BLAKE NICHOLSON http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140929884 BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — A weed strong enough to stop combines and resist many herbicides has been confirmed in South Dakota for the first time, raising concerns it could spread and cut deeply into crop production in the Upper Midwest — one of the few areas it hadn’t yet invaded.

The threat from Palmer amaranth is so great that officials in North Dakota have named it the weed of the year, even though it has yet to be found in the state.

“If you think you find plants — kill it!” North Dakota State University Extension Weed Specialist Rich Zollinger said. “Don’t even think. Just kill it.”

In South Dakota, Palmer amaranth is now a reality. A few scattered plants were found this summer on the edge of a sunflower field in Buffalo County.

“We really don’t know if it’s going to become a significant problem for us or not, but we’re going to keep a very close eye on it to make sure that we’re on top of it if it does develop,” said Paul Johnson, extension weed science coordinator for South Dakota State University.

The weed some officials refer to as “Satan” has moved into the Midwest from cotton country, and was discovered in western Iowa soybean fields last year. It’s native to desert regions of the southwest U.S. and northern Mexico.

Palmer amaranth can be spread in a number of ways, including on farm machinery or in grass seed. The plants can grow as tall as 7 feet, each one producing as much as a million seeds. Its stems can grow as thick as baseball bats.

“The big concern is, in Southern states, it has developed — quickly — resistance to a considerable amount of herbicides,” Johnson said.

SDSU plans to monitor the site where it was found in South Dakota to determine if any seeds survive the winter, which Johnson said it hadn’t in the past in northern climes.

“It will all depend on if it can develop characteristics so it can overwinter in our climate,” he said. “That’s the part we really don’t know.

“But the weed does have the ability to change. Maybe that will be the change it makes — adapting to a northern climate.”

Another concern is that the weed was found near the Missouri River. Johnson said the climate there could be favorable because of the heat of the water near the dams, but added, “We won’t know until next spring.”

Meanwhile, North Dakota and Minnesota are on high alert.

“I think there is a high probability that it will move into these two states, and is just a matter of time,” Zollinger said. “Movement of equipment and combines and water flow will make establishment here likely. That’s why we’re trying to keep growers educated on ID and quick removal.”

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Outlook bright for livestock, dairy http://www.capitalpress.com/Nation_World/Nation/20140926/outlook-bright-for-livestock-dairy http://www.capitalpress.com/Nation_World/Nation/20140926/outlook-bright-for-livestock-dairy#Comments Fri, 26 Sep 2014 10:14:25 -0400 Carol Ryan Dumas http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014140929886 Livestock and dairy producers have been on the up side of the supply-and-demand equation this year, with the added benefit of lower feed costs, and they can expect the same in 2015, according to the latest outlook reports by the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute at the University of Missouri.

On the flip side, growers of grains and oilseeds have seen a sharp price decline from recent peaks and can expect even lower prices for this year’s crop, FAPRI economists reported.

“It’s a huge reversal of fortunes,” said Pat Westhoff, one of those economists.

Livestock receipts are expected to exceed crop receipts this year, he said.

USDA Economic Research Service if forecasting 2014 livestock receipts will eclipse crop receipts by $8.7 billion, flipping the balance in annual receipts. Crop receipts exceeded livestock receipts by: $34.3 billion in 2013; $52.0 billion in 2012; $36.1 billion in 2011; and 38.1 billion in 2010.

Reduced supply and strong international demand has brought record prices for cattle, hogs and milk and higher retail prices for meat and dairy products, FAPRI economists reported.

FAPRI projects 2014 prices per hundredweight of $150.42 for fed steers, up about $25 from 2013, and $212.75 for feeder steers, up almost $54.

It also projects barrow and gilt prices of $75.96 per hundredweight, up almost $2, and $70.61 per hundredweight for sows, up $11.

In the milk arena, FAPRI projects 2014 prices per hundredweight at $20.39 for Class III, up $2.40 from 2013, and $21.70 for Class IV, up $2.65. The projected all-milk price for 2014 is $22.80, up $2.68.

Beef supplies are limited, pork production is lower due to porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv) and demand is good, bringing good returns to producers. Poultry is along for the ride of higher meat prices, and poultry producers are seeing good returns as well, Westhoff said.

Factored into livestock and dairy returns is a second straight year of record corn and soybean production as well as large global supplies, he said.

Larger corn and soybean crops translate into lower projected 2014/2015 prices for many grains and oilseeds. Corn prices drop to $3.50 a bushel, soybeans to $9.92 per bushel and wheat to $5.91 per bushel.

Those prices are down from the 2013 harvested crop of $4.45 for corn, $13 for soybeans and $6.87 for wheat, the economists reported.

Projected prices for the 2015 crop increase to $3.80 for corn and $5.42 for wheat but decrease to 9.04 for soybeans.

Prices are expected to recover longer term as markets adjust, with FAPRI projecting average prices of $4.10 for corn, $10.21 for soybeans and $5.78 for wheat over the 2016-2018 period.

Livestock and milk prices are also expected to decline in the longer term due to a supply response to higher prices and lower feed costs.

Beef cattle and milk prices are expected to ease roughly $2 to $4 per hundredweight in 2015 and average $131.83 for fed steers, $178.36 for feeder steers, $16.69 for Class I, $16.86 for Class IV, and $18.52 for all-milk for the 2016-2018 period

Prices are projected to drop $9 per hundredweight for barrow and gilt and $4 for sows in 2015 and average $56.43 and $48.84, respectively, for the 2016-2018 period.

FAPRI usually puts out a big baseline report in March with an update in August, but will be putting out a monthly report, depending on response, to help farmers and ranchers evaluate options in new farm bill programs, Westhoff said.

Online

Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute, University of Missouri: www.fapri.missouri.edu

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