Capital Press | Special Sections http://www.capitalpress.com Capital Press Sat, 1 Oct 2016 09:04:25 -0400 en http://EOR-CPwebvarnish.newscyclecloud.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/staticimage/images/rss-logo.jpg Capital Press | Special Sections http://www.capitalpress.com From engineer to wine producer http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160927/from-engineer-to-wine-producer http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160927/from-engineer-to-wine-producer#Comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 17:32:54 -0400 Brenna Wiegand http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160929874 The conversion of a poultry barn into a winery is not as dramatic as the life change Sean Driggers underwent in his quest to make fine wine.

Pudding River Wine Cellars east of Salem originated on property Driggers’ in-laws, John and Karen Bateman, purchased 20 years ago. In 2004 Driggers, an avid wine enthusiast, helped them put in a vineyard.

Before that, Driggers and his wife, Stacey, lived in Seattle, he a mechanical engineer in telecommunications and she an Intel engineer. Stacey’s job transferred, but the prospect of starting from scratch made Sean see red — and white — and he took the plunge into commercial winemaking.

In its 10 years, Pudding River Wine Cellars has made a splash with its small-lot, boutique wines and makes custom wine for half a dozen other producers.

Driggers has high praise for Chemeketa Community College’s viticulture school he and his father-in-law attended in 2005. Driggers went on to attend CCC’s winemaking school.

“It was a consuming hobby for 15 years, but nothing beats going to school,” he said. “At school I learned everything I needed to know for making wine.”

First harvest was in 2006 and the whole family took part in launching the venture.

“It’s just me now,” he said. “I run the tasting room, do all the books, labor, festivals, marketing and events in addition to the vineyard and making the wine.”

Production has multiplied several times and the winery, set up for 3,000 cases a year, is now producing 5,000.

“It’s a lot of cycles,” Driggers said. “I employ more farm labor. We worked the vines by ourselves the first couple years and it about killed us.”

The winery broke even its third year and started turning a profit in the seventh year.

In the process Driggers has learned it’s best to “celebrate” the capriciousness of Mother Nature.

“Oregon has some pretty variable vintages; upstarts are always at risk,” Driggers said. “September of 2013 a typhoon came through here and dumped 7 inches of rain in a week-and-a-half.”

Back at the winery, Driggers says the key to exceptional wine lies in its barreling.

“It’s a nuance; like adding a spice, and I think that’s where winemakers get to use their genius,” he said. “I learned from some key people over the years and it has become one of my specialties.”

The varieties aged in oak are put in barrels whose insides have been charred to a certain “toast level.” The residual charcoal mellows out the wood so the wine “doesn’t taste like wood” and makes for buttery, sweeter wines more like their French counterparts.

“…But that effect lasts only a year, two at the most,” Driggers said. “If you want that flavor; that spice, you have to use new barrels every year and figure out what you want to use for each wine.

“We’re getting a good reputation for that,” he added. “We won a gold ribbon at the Oregon State Fair in 2007 for our Pinot gris and every year after that have not been able to make enough.

“I’ve almost stopped doing the competitions anymore with the increasing wine tourism,” Driggers said. “People from all over the country come to this area already knowing which wineries they’re going to visit.”

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Pilot lands new career as winemaker http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160927/pilot-lands-new-career-as-winemaker http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160927/pilot-lands-new-career-as-winemaker#Comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 17:25:50 -0400 Hear Smith Thomas http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160929875 For Tim Harless, a veteran Air Force and commercial pilot, making premium wines is the result of a life-long love of exploration and experimentation.

In 2002 his interest in wine was sparked after visiting a wine bar near Dallas, Texas. After being exposed to several varietals and noting the distinctions between the wines he was tasting, he became intrigued. He studied the differences in the world’s wines and decided to become a winemaker.

“Many people enter the wine world sideways from other paths. I took an adult certificate program in winemaking, Viticulture and Enology at Grayson County Community College in Texas,” he said. “These courses were designed for working professionals, held all day Fridays and Saturdays.”

He took a couple years to get through it, and went to California during vacation to work during a crush — when the grapes are harvested. Then in 2011 and 2012 he worked alongside the former owners at Vale Wine Co.

For his own winery, he combined family heritage in the labeling of his product. The HAT Ranch label harks back to great-grandparents Jake and Margarette Frison, who homesteaded in Wyoming in 1902 and started the HAT Ranch, eventually running 1,700 head of cattle. Their brand was the shape of a cowboy hat.

Inspired by pioneering ancestors, Harless and his wife, Helen, followed suit by choosing Idaho as their winemaking homestead, the new frontier of the wine industry.

“We looked around Washington, Oregon and California. We made a trip to Idaho, tasted some of the wines and realized there was tremendous potential here; the climate is similar to Eastern Washington where there are so many vineyards,” he said.

“We produced our wine for the first couple years at the Vale Wine Co. facility, then bought their production equipment and label. We continue making their label, plus some of our own,” Harless said.

Helen’s two-year experience managing the wine cellar and organizing tastings for Wine Spectator magazine exposed her to the world’s top wines. She became the “palate” for their winery.

Together they knew they had a shot at producing great wines.

Their wine-production facility is located at the University of Idaho Business Incubator, and the tasting room is on Plum Road on the Sunnyslope Wine Trail.

“This has become a popular area for wineries, since most of the grapes in Idaho are grown here,” Harless said.

“Many things must come together to make wine, including a good location if you sell wine. You need to be on a road where people can find you,” he said.

The wine business was already established in the area, with Ste. Chappelle, Williamson, Fujishin, Huston, Bitner and Koenig.

“We grow some of our own Muscat grapes, which we produce into a dry Moscato which last year won the Idaho Best Show award,” he said. “We’ll also have Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet Franc this year.”

HAT Ranch is expanding varieties and quantity, and also buys from Skyline and Sawtooth Vineyards, one of the biggest in Idaho.

Helen is a dentist, but involved with the winery doing marketing and social media. The team includes the tasting room staff and Cellarmaster Will Wetmore.

HAT Ranch produces about 1,500 cases annually, with plans to increase to 3,000.

“We make classic varietals like Cabernet, Merlot and Syrah under the Vale label and unoaked Chardonnay, dry Moscato, white blends and red blends under the HAT Ranch label.”

Most of their wine is sold directly to consumers through their tasting room, and about 25 percent to restaurants, wine shops, the Boise Co-op and Whole Foods, but some people have also found them online.

HAT Ranch

Location: Caldwell, Idaho

Established: 2014

Owners: Tim and Helen Harless

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Winemaker focuses on tradition, not trends http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160916/winemaker-focuses-on-tradition-not-trends http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160916/winemaker-focuses-on-tradition-not-trends#Comments Fri, 16 Sep 2016 14:42:43 -0400 JULIA HOLLISTER http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160919921 For Robbie Meyer, winemaker at Murrieta’s Well in Livermore, Calif., exposure to wine started early in his hometown of Marietta, Ga.

“I always worked in restaurants growing up and I began tasting nightly with the wait staff throughout high school,” he said. “I eventually became the wine steward when I was 18.”

He studied biology and chemistry in college and wanted to use his degree in the real world. He continued his education at the University of California-Davis in enology and viticulture.

“I also wanted to work with my hands, work outside and work in a creative endeavor,” he said. “In addition, I am a longtime wine fan, so it wasn’t hard to make the connection.”

Before joining Murrieta’s Well as director of winemaking in 2015, Meyer worked with vineyards and wineries in Napa Valley, Sonoma County and Santa Barbara.

Along the way, he said he has noticed consumer drinking habits

“I had heard of trends in the industry when I was first starting out,” he said. “After 20 years, I really get a sense of seeing consumer trends, and winemaking trends come and go. The rise and fall and rise again patterns of Merlot, Pinot noir, rose and others are fun to watch.

The lesson for the winemaker, he said, “is simply to focus on producing quality wines and not to chase trends.”

He employs traditional winemaking techniques that embrace the Livermore Valley climate to get the best varietal expression that the estate vineyards can offer and that wine lovers appreciate.

Meyer also enjoys the product of his work. He said he planned to have Murrieta’s Well “The Spur,” a lush red blend, for dinner.

“I’ll be enjoying a bottle with grilled corn, asparagus, red bell peppers, and filet mignon — medium-rare, of course,” he said.

Trends may come and go, he said, but troublesome critters in the vineyards — sharpshooters, wasps, moths, gophers, moles, voles, ground squirrels, turkeys, birds, coyotes and deer — are endless.

Meyer said the winery tries to mitigate the threat of major disease or severe fruit damage using simple, natural methods such as good farming practices, birds of prey and bird netting. He said vineyards are part of nature and grow symbiotically in that environment.

Beyond pests, the California wine industry faces another challenge.

“Quite simply, climate change is the biggest challenge facing California viticulture,” he said. “While we don’t use a tremendous amount of water, we do need the historical average rainfall which we have not been getting in the last several years. The recent warmer vintages have actually helped us, but if it’s a continually warming trend, that’s not a good trend.”

For Meyer,the challenges are worth it.

“In spite of pests and challenges, having a career that you love, that challenges you, that you look forward to everyday is something for which to be incredibly thankful,” he said.

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Chateau Ste. Michelle to celebrate 50 years http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/chateau-ste-michelle-to-celebrate-50-years http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/chateau-ste-michelle-to-celebrate-50-years#Comments Thu, 8 Sep 2016 10:17:31 -0400 Hear Smith Thomas http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160909877 Chateau Ste. Michelle, Washington state’s largest winery, will celebrate its 50th anniversary in 2017.

Ryan Pennington, director of communications, says the company has several properties in Washington, Oregon and California.

“We are also importers of wine from France, New Zealand, Italy, Spain and Chile,” he said.

In Washington, the property in Woodinville is where visitors can experience the wines, and this is where the white wines are produced. The red wines are produced in a winery in Eastern Washington, at Paterson.

Chateau Ste. Michelle grew out of a merger of Pomerelle Wine Co. and the National Wine Co., whose roots go back to 1934 after the repeal of Prohibition, Pennington said.

“After they merged, they introduced the Ste. Michelle Vineyards label, made from traditional Old World grape varieties, as opposed to the fruit wine they had been producing,” he said. “This set the stage for quality wine grape production in Washington.”

Vineyards are now well established in the Northwest, and the industry has seen tremendous growth.

“This has been driven by continual improvements in quality as well as dedicated marketing efforts — to open more markets for Washington wines around the country and around the world,” Pennington said.

A dedicated staff creates a successful team effort.

Chateau Ste. Michelle’s head winemaker, Bob Bertheau, splits his time between Western and Eastern Washington.

“We also have head winemakers for both the white wines and red wines, under Bob, and they oversee production at those respective facilities,” Pennington said. “In addition, they have a host of assistant winemakers and vineyard personnel.”

Some of the vineyards are owned by the company and some are under long-term contracts.

Chateau Ste. Michelle owns two estate vineyards — Cold Creek Vineyard north of the Tri-cities and the Canoe Ridge Estate vineyard near the winery at Paterson.

“The percentage of vineyards that we actually own as a company is relatively small, but most of our contract vineyards are farmed exclusively for us by partner growers,” he said.

“Much of our wine is sold direct to consumers through our winery tasting rooms,” he said. “The winery at Woodinville is the principal tasting room for Chateau Ste. Michelle, but each of our wineries has a tasting room. Consumers like to experience where the grapes are grown and the wines are made. People can look behind the curtain a little and see the process behind it.”

The tasting room in Woodinville is a popular tourist destination and one of the leading attractions in the state, drawing 300,000 visitors each year.

“They come for the experience as well as the wines. It’s common to see people out on the grounds picnicking and enjoying the wines. We also host a popular summer concert series at that winery,” he said.

“We also sell wholesale to retailers and restaurants, and direct-to-consumer sales online through our website,” he said. “Many consumers enjoy the convenience of purchasing wine online, but the challenge revolves around which states you can ship wine to, and to whom, and how much. This can be complicated, with a patchwork of regulation that is difficult to navigate.”

To support continued growth in the industry, the wine industry and Chateau Ste. Michelle have invested heavily in research, in the Wine Science Center at the Washington State University Tri-Cities campus. The center opened a couple years ago as a dedicated wine research facility.

“It is already producing research to help improve quality and to maintain the growth that the industry has enjoyed,” said Pennington.

Demand for Washington wines, and for Chateau Ste. Michelle wines, is as strong as it’s ever been.

“This is a growing industry, and the challenge is to supply that demand. It all starts in the vineyards, so we are planting more and producing more. All signs point to a very healthy future,” he said.

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Vineyard brings new dimension to Pinot http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/vineyard-brings-new-dimension-to-pinot http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/vineyard-brings-new-dimension-to-pinot#Comments Thu, 8 Sep 2016 10:17:16 -0400 Margarett Waterbury he http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160909878 Becoming a winemaker was far from inevitable for Jim Fischer. But when his father and uncle asked for his help propagating Pinot vines while he was home from college during winter break, they opened a door to a lifelong calling.

Crowley Station Vineyards is a 15-acre vineyard in the Eola-Amity Hills sited on a larger 170-acre parcel that has been in the Fischer family since the 1970s.

In 2000, the Fischers began propagating thousands of own-rooted Pinot noir vines, which they planted in 2001. Since then, they’ve been expanding the vineyard with additional periodic plantings.

“Everything in the older plantings is own-rooted,” explains Fischer. “I would not advise anyone do to that because of phylloxera. It’s an issue of when, not if. We haven’t spotted it yet, but it will succumb at some point. All our newer plantings are on rootstock.”

These older plantings were sited on “the worst piece” of the south-facing slope, a field with exceptionally shallow, rocky soil, with less than a foot of topsoil in some areas. “We thought, if we could grow them there, we could grow them elsewhere on the property.”

Today, 14 acres are planted to Pinot noir, and one acre to Pinot gris. There’s no external vineyard manager; Fischer’s dad, Jim Fischer Sr., manages the entire vineyard with help from his son and other family members, all of whom have full-time off-farm jobs.

There’s also no irrigation. Everything is completely dry-farmed, although during the last two scorching summers, they needed to hand-water new plants. That combination of challenging soil and dry farming means Crowley Ranch doesn’t need to drop fruit, as the plants set an appropriate amount of fruit on their own.

Most of Crowley Station’s grapes are sold to winemakers, with a focus on high-end producers able to elevate the vineyard’s exposure.

“To keep prices sustainable for us, we want to have name recognition for the vineyard. We want producers to put our name on the label,” says Fischer.

That strategy has paid off. In 2014, a Crowley Station Pinot noir made by Day Wines earned the highest score of any Oregon Pinot noir in Wine + Spirits Magazine, 94 points.

Fischer and his partner, Jenny Mosbacher, also run a wine label called Fossil + Fawn that showcases Crowley Station fruit. “There’s a sea change happening in the wine world,” says Fischer, “An emerging third wave of wine that’s mobilizing a younger generation to get passionate. We want to be part of that rising tide.”

“This is an interesting time in the valley,” says Mosbacher. “It’s a moment where people can sell $100-plus bottles of Pinot, or they can sell it in a can for $6.”

What’s next for Crowley Station? “My dream is to plant some other things,” says Fischer. “‘Sideways’ killed Merlot, and if people are so capricious that a movie is all it takes, when is peak Pinot? Are we there, or did it happen already?

“But for Oregon wine, Pinot may always be king,” he says. “I’m from Oregon, and I think we make some of the best wine in the world. I’m not concerned with what they do in France. They make the best Burgundy in France, but we make the best Oregon Pinot in Oregon.”

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Winery part of Idaho’s burgeoning industry http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/winery-part-of-idahos-burgeoning-industry http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/winery-part-of-idahos-burgeoning-industry#Comments Thu, 8 Sep 2016 10:17:12 -0400 Hear Smith Thomas http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160909879 In a sense, this winery got its start in pre-history.

“Our company is named after volcanic cinders found in this valley,” explains winemaker Melanie Krause. “Cinder is formed when volcanoes erupt underneath water, which happened in the area around Nampa and Caldwell — which was under an ancient lake at one time.”

She learned to make wine while working for Chateau Ste. Michelle in Washington state.

“My business partner and husband Joe Schnerr covers sales and marketing while I focus on winemaking and vineyard relations. We’ve been making wines here in Idaho for 10 years and are very excited about how our company has grown, and how well the wine industry is doing in Idaho.”

Krause believes it was a good decision to return to her hometown to start their wine business.

“I grew up in Boise and was gone for 12 years while going to college at Washington State University and becoming a winemaker,” she said.

She decided to be a winemaker when she moved to the Tri-Cities area of Washington, located in the heart of Washington wine country.

“I had a good background for this, with degrees in biology and Spanish, and a lot of work history in agriculture. Plus it didn’t hurt that I grew up in my mother’s kitchen,” Krause said.

She learned winemaking on the job, first in the vineyards for two years and then during an apprenticeship in the winery at Chateau Ste. Michelle.

But Idaho winemaking is her focus.

“It’s exciting to see new planting going on, and matching of different varieties to the land here in Idaho,” she said.

Idaho wines are getting good scores in the big wine publications, she adds. “In this industry, much of your success is tied to the reputation of the region, so it is crucial to have partners like the Idaho Wine Commission helping market Idaho wines to local, regional and international press.

“We just received a 92 point score from Wine Enthusiast magazine with our Tempranillo and we’ve had several Best of Class with Sunset International Wine Competition,” she said.

The first 10 years were spent establishing the winery and strong relationships with growers.

“The next 10 years will be about pushing the envelope with the quality of the wines as new plantings come on in, and new vineyards are started,” she said. “I predict that the quality and quantity of world-class wines from the Snake River Valley will continue to grow in the next decade. The Idaho Wine Commission likes to say that Idaho has arrived, but I am always planning the future and feel it will become even better.”

Cinder contracts with six local vineyards in the Snake River Valley AVA (American Viticulture Area), which has a unique climate conducive to grape growing and good wines. The Cinder tasting room and winery, in the same building, are open 7 days a week in Garden City, only 10 minutes from downtown Boise.

“Our beautiful tasting room is very friendly. People like to sit and have a glass of wine here, or explore the winery and learn something new about wines they might otherwise never try,” she said.

“Our most popular wines include Viognier and Syrah. We are also having fun making Tempranillo, a Spanish variety that grows in areas of Spain like the Ribera del Duero that are very similar climatically to our area,” said Krause.

Cinder is a family business that started with just Krause and her husband.

“We only made 2 barrels of wine the first year in 2006, which is about 45 cases,” she said. “Now we have seven full-time employees, quite a few part-time employees and produce 7,000 cases per year. We have been growing rapidly and feel fortunate to have really great people on our team.”

Cinder Wines

Location: Garden City, Idaho

Since: 2005

Owners: Melanie Krause and Joe Schnerr

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A computer career derailed by grapes http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/a-computer-career-derailed-by-grapes http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/a-computer-career-derailed-by-grapes#Comments Thu, 8 Sep 2016 10:17:09 -0400 JULIA HOLLISTER http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160909880 Napa winemaker Victoria Coleman planned a career in computer science but a part-time job changed her life.

“I was born and raised in Seattle and moved to Napa in 1998 with a plan to continue studying computers,” she said.

She got a job at Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars as the winery’s temporary receptionist.

“After three months I moved to production assistant,” she said.

That move set the scene for her future.

As production assistant she was exposed to principles and practices in the vineyard and the winery. She learned to taste grapes, to make harvest decisions and to evaluate fining trials — in which the type and amount of various agents are tested — and blends.

This exposure created a thirst for the knowledge to understand the vineyard and winemaking.

She initially took classes at Napa Valley Junior College to get a deeper understanding of viticulture and enology.

Coleman was hooked. She entered the University of Californa-Davis to soak up more knowledge and develop her own style of winemaking.

She began working with Lobo Wines, part of Wulff Vineyards in Napa’s Atlas Peak Appellation, in 2008.

“I do as much as possible in the vineyard to balance the grape clusters with the number of leaves to reach near perfect ripeness with lots of character,” she said. “Conversely, I do as little as possible with the fruit in the cellar to allow it to give the wine a sense of time and place.”

She noted that consumer tastes have changed through the years. Today more consumers prefer red wine than white wine.

In spite of the upsurge in the wine drinking public, she said there are challenges facing California viticulture.

“I think there are two areas of concern,” she said. “Number one is red blotch disease. There is not much known about this virus, other than it was first discovered from a leaf in a Sonoma vineyard in 1944.”

In recent years, it was mistaken for leaf roll virus, because they both share similar visual symptoms, she said.

“It was discovered in a lab that there are two vectors of this disease, but they’ve not been discovered in the vineyard, so it is not certain how it spreads in the vineyard,” she said.

As a result of the disease, the quality of the fruit is diminished — low Brix levels and high acidity.

“We pulled out infected Cabernet Sauvignon vines in 2014 and have since replanted those vines,” she said.

The lack of skilled labor in the fields ranks second among her concerns.

“A bright spot is that more women are becoming winemakers today than five years ago,” she said. “I would say that is because of the legendary ones who have paved the way.”

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Pilot lands new career as winemaker http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/pilot-lands-new-career-as-winemaker http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/pilot-lands-new-career-as-winemaker#Comments Thu, 8 Sep 2016 10:17:05 -0400 Hear Smith Thomas http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160909881 For Tim Harless, a veteran Air Force and commercial pilot, making premium wines is the result of a life-long love of exploration and experimentation.

In 2002 his interest in wine was sparked after visiting a wine bar near Dallas, Texas. After being exposed to several varietals and noting the distinctions between the wines he was tasting, he became intrigued. He studied the differences in the world’s wines and decided to become a winemaker.

“Many people enter the wine world sideways from other paths. I took an adult certificate program in winemaking, Viticulture and Enology at Grayson County Community College in Texas,” he said. “These courses were designed for working professionals, held all day Fridays and Saturdays.”

He took a couple years to get through it, and went to California during vacation to work during a crush — when the grapes are harvested. Then in 2011 and 2012 he worked alongside the former owners at Vale Wine Co.

For his own winery, he combined family heritage in the labeling of his product. The HAT Ranch label harks back to great-grandparents Jake and Margarette Frison, who homesteaded in Wyoming in 1902 and started the HAT Ranch, eventually running 1,700 head of cattle. Their brand was the shape of a cowboy hat.

Inspired by pioneering ancestors, Harless and his wife, Helen, followed suit by choosing Idaho as their winemaking homestead, the new frontier of the wine industry.

“We looked around Washington, Oregon and California. We made a trip to Idaho, tasted some of the wines and realized there was tremendous potential here; the climate is similar to Eastern Washington where there are so many vineyards,” he said.

“We produced our wine for the first couple years at the Vale Wine Co. facility, then bought their production equipment and label. We continue making their label, plus some of our own,” Harless said.

Helen’s two-year experience managing the wine cellar and organizing tastings for Wine Spectator magazine exposed her to the world’s top wines. She became the “palate” for their winery.

Together they knew they had a shot at producing great wines.

Their wine-production facility is located at the University of Idaho Business Incubator, and the tasting room is on Plum Road on the Sunnyslope Wine Trail.

“This has become a popular area for wineries, since most of the grapes in Idaho are grown here,” Harless said.

“Many things must come together to make wine, including a good location if you sell wine. You need to be on a road where people can find you,” he said.

The wine business was already established in the area, with Ste. Chappelle, Williamson, Fujishin, Huston, Bitner and Koenig.

“We grow some of our own Muscat grapes, which we produce into a dry Moscato which last year won the Idaho Best Show award,” he said. “We’ll also have Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet Franc this year.”

HAT Ranch is expanding varieties and quantity, and also buys from Skyline and Sawtooth Vineyards, one of the biggest in Idaho.

Helen is a dentist, but involved with the winery doing marketing and social media. The team includes the tasting room staff and Cellarmaster Will Wetmore.

HAT Ranch produces about 1,500 cases annually, with plans to increase to 3,000.

“We make classic varietals like Cabernet, Merlot and Syrah under the Vale label and unoaked Chardonnay, dry Moscato, white blends and red blends under the HAT Ranch label.”

Most of their wine is sold directly to consumers through their tasting room, and about 25 percent to restaurants, wine shops, the Boise Co-op and Whole Foods, but some people have also found them online.

HAT Ranch

Location: Caldwell, Idaho

Established: 2014

Owners: Tim and Helen Harless

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Working at vineyard ‘about the ritual’ http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/working-at-vineyard-about-the-ritual http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/working-at-vineyard-about-the-ritual#Comments Thu, 8 Sep 2016 10:17:00 -0400 JULIA HOLLISTER http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160909882 Third-generation Californian Sean Garvey admits he had no thought of returning to the family’s vineyards after college.

“My parents moved to Napa in 1977 because my grandfather bought a ranch there with the plan to retire,” he said. “He fell in love with the land and called it ‘a piece of heaven’ — especially because the kids were nearby.”

Garvey’s parents, Julie and Pat Garvey, and her brother and his wife, John and Carrie Komes, founded the winery.

Julie and John ran the winery and Pat Garvey ran the vineyard side of the family business.

“The industry was pretty young back then and everyone was still learning,” Garvey said. “But there was a real sense of community where people were willing to help each other.”

He grew up working with his dad and then entered Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo with a focus on music, writing and other pursuits.

Viticulture was absolutely not in the future, but a summer stay in Europe “turned the light on,” he said.

“I lived with a family in Spain while I was studying and each night that we sat down to dinner they would open up a bottle of wine,” he said. “It was not so much about the quality of the wine but more about the ritual of it. It allowed us all to slow down and enjoy both the meal and the company.

“This is why I’m in the wine business. It’s about the ritual and working alongside my family.”

As viticulture manager, Garvey oversees all day-to-day operations: from negotiating contracts to new plantings, spraying and other programs.

Harvest is the most intense time of the year because of the small window and things are moving fast.

“We focus on Bordeaux varieties on 300 acres in 10 different locations,” he said.

They start picking at around 2 a.m. so they can get fruit to the winery before the weather gets warm, which can degrade the quality of the grapes.

“We try to finish the day by 11 in the morning. This schedule also protects vineyard workers from picking in the hot sun,” he said. “We pick Sauvignon Blanc early, then Chardonnay. Cabernet Sauvignon is the last grape harvested.”

Garvey said although the quantity of the 2016 harvest has been down, the quality won’t suffer. He predicts a tremendous year in spite of the challenges.

“The spread of red blotch and leaf roll viruses and trunk diseases keep me up at night,” he said. “Sourcing clean planting material is also an ongoing challenge.”

The love of the land and the people that work there rise above the problems.

“There is a culture and work ethic in the vineyards that is inspiring and unique when compared to other working environments,” Garvey said. “I also enjoy working alongside my dad. I have great respect for the work he has done to help create and improve farmworker housing in Napa Valley and the integrity with which he runs our business.”

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Biodynamic vineyard a step beyond http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/biodynamic-vineyard-a-step-beyond http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/biodynamic-vineyard-a-step-beyond#Comments Thu, 8 Sep 2016 10:16:56 -0400 Margarett Waterbury http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160909883 Transitioning from conventional to organic methods can be daunting — but with patience, the payoff can be significant.

Johan Vineyards in Rickreall, Ore., is an example of how it’s never too late to make a change.

Dan Rinke came to Johan Vineyards in 2007, when he was hired as a winegrower. The owners wanted to transition the vineyard from conventional to organic methods, but Rinke took it one step further, converting the entire operation to biodynamic.

Rinke holds a degree in viticulture from the University of California-Fresno, where he developed a strong interest in biodynamic, organic and sustainable winemaking.

“The wine basically makes itself,” he says. “But the grapes don’t grow themselves. They need more attention.”

Sited on 175 acres of oak savannah and fields in the Van Duzer corridor, Johan Vineyards currently grows 63 acres of vines: 40 acres planted in 2002, with an additional 23 acres planted in 2009. Most are Pinot, but there are also plantings of Chardonnay, Pinot gris, Gruner Veltiner, Blaufrankisch, Cabernet Franc, Melon de Bourgogne, Gamay and Chenin blanc.

“My methods lean towards a cross-section of permaculture and biodynamic principles,” Rinke explains. “Grapes are a permanent crop, like an orchard, except they’re vines, which tend to be edge-of-forest plants. I want to start applying that kind of thinking. With the right companion plantings, we might be able to decrease pesticides. Permanent cover crops with different species of grasses, legumes and cereals could bring beneficials and work in a symbiotic way. We need to start thinking in terms of ecology rather than one specific crop.”

The transition wasn’t easy. Rinke saw a decline in grape quality for five years as the vines adapted to lower fertilizer inputs and increased pressure from weeds and pests. Initially, he’d also planned to stop irrigating at the same time, but he decided that would put too much stress on the grapes during a difficult time.

Instead, Rinke started doing everything he could to build new microbial life in the soil, including fertigating with hydrolyzed, cold-processed fish.

After five years, the vines rebounded with renewed vigor, and today the vineyard is lush and productive. With the exception of new plantings, Rinke hasn’t irrigated or fertilized since 2010.

The majority of Johan’s grapes are sold to other winemakers.

“I have 17 or 18 different wineries I sell to. That’s a full-time job, dealing with 18 winemakers, all very opinionated people,” he says with a smile.

And on top of that, Rinke makes Johan’s line of all-estate, native yeast wines. Grapes from the site have a slightly thicker skin due to the marine winds from the Van Duzer corridor, and Rinke describes the site style as nuanced, light, and “pretty,” with higher acidity and lower alcohol.

“At the end of the day, for me, it’s all about soil ecology,” explains Rinke. “Biodynamic takes a step into spiritual beliefs, a way of creating spiritual food for people. That side? I’m agnostic. I don’t know anything about the second spiritual realm. Maybe when I’m dead I’ll figure it out. But I do know it’s a great way to build life in your soil.”

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Winemaker brings his wine to the people http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/winemaker-brings-his-wine-to-the-people http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/winemaker-brings-his-wine-to-the-people#Comments Thu, 8 Sep 2016 10:16:51 -0400 Hear Smith Thomas http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160909884 Charles Smith Wines bills itself as the largest winemaker-owned winery in Washington state and the third largest winery in the state. The brand has grown tremendously since its small beginnings, founded by Charles Smith, a former rock band tour manager.

Smith was born in the U.S. and grew up near Sacramento, Calif., in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. His mother was Welsh and his father was French, so Smith had an interest in traveling the world at a young age. He moved to Denmark and spent the next nine years managing rock bands, including the famed Danish duo, the Ravonettes, and concert tours throughout Europe.

Wining and dining on the road with his bands spurred a passion for good wine.

“In 1999, I moved back to the U.S. and opened a wine shop on Bainbridge Island, just across Puget Sound from downtown Seattle,” he said. “Later that year I went on a road trip to Walla Walla, where I met a young Frenchman and winemaker who shared my same passion for great Syrah. I decided to move to Walla Walla and make my own juice.”

He named his first creation K Syrah. This 1999 release from Walla Walla Valley initiated the style of classic winemaking that Smith continues today: small lot, single-vineyard wines, all hand-picked grapes, foot-stomped, fermented with naturally occurring yeasts and basket pressed.

What started as selling wine out of the back of his Astro van has grown to become the largest independent winery in the state.

In 2006, he launched Charles Smith Wines, to build on his philosophy of “wine for everyone every day.” His intent is to create wines to be enjoyed now, but with classic variety — Merlot that tastes like Merlot — and true to the place of origin. The wines are full of flavor and balanced. His Kung Fu Girl Riesling is one of the top-selling Rieslings in the country.

Charles Smith Wines has now grown to include K Vintners, Charles Smith Wines, ViNO, Secco Italian Bubbles, SIXTO, Wines of Substance, Casa Smith and one-half of Charles & Charles, with more in the works. Each eye-catching label brings something unique to the table. The brand now sells more than 750,000 cases a year. Pricing from $12 to $120 a bottle enables them to be sold in many different markets and to a wide audience.

“I make wine for everyone,” Smith says. “I want everyone to be able to enjoy a good glass of wine, and a good glass of wine doesn’t have to mean expensive wine, it means good wine.”

Charles Smith Wines is headquartered in Walla Walla, where the vineyards and a tasting room are. In 2015, he opened a new tasting room in Seattle called Charles Smith Wines Jet City — the largest urban winery on the West Coast.

“I wanted to bring my wine to the people,” he says. The 32,000-square-foot, one-of-a-kind winery and two-story tasting room was formerly a Dr. Pepper bottling plant. Located in the Georgetown section of Seattle that has a rich history of manufacturing, the winery is contributing to this growing community and celebrating its first-year anniversary this August.

“We sell a lot of wine because we make delicious, accessible wine — from Kung Fu Girl, available across the country and ready to drink the moment you open it, to our K wines,” Smith says.

He believes that being considered one of the top five producers from Washington is an honor, and a responsibility to uphold.

Charles Smith Wines

Founded: 2001

Owner: Charles Smith

Location: Walla Walla, Wash.

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From engineer to wine producer http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/from-engineer-to-wine-producer http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/from-engineer-to-wine-producer#Comments Thu, 8 Sep 2016 10:16:45 -0400 Brenna Wiegand http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160909885 The conversion of a poultry barn into a winery is not as dramatic as the life change Sean Driggers underwent in his quest to make fine wine.

Pudding River Wine Cellars east of Salem originated on property Driggers’ in-laws, John and Karen Bateman, purchased 20 years ago. In 2004 Driggers, an avid wine enthusiast, helped them put in a vineyard.

Before that, Driggers and his wife, Stacey, lived in Seattle, he a mechanical engineer in telecommunications and she an Intel engineer. Stacey’s job transferred, but the prospect of starting from scratch made Sean see red — and white — and he took the plunge into commercial winemaking.

In its 10 years, Pudding River Wine Cellars has made a splash with its small-lot, boutique wines and makes custom wine for half a dozen other producers.

Driggers has high praise for Chemeketa Community College’s viticulture school he and his father-in-law attended in 2005. Driggers went on to attend CCC’s winemaking school.

“It was a consuming hobby for 15 years, but nothing beats going to school,” he said. “At school I learned everything I needed to know for making wine.”

First harvest was in 2006 and the whole family took part in launching the venture.

“It’s just me now,” he said. “I run the tasting room, do all the books, labor, festivals, marketing and events in addition to the vineyard and making the wine.”

Production has multiplied several times and the winery, set up for 3,000 cases a year, is now producing 5,000.

“It’s a lot of cycles,” Driggers said. “I employ more farm labor. We worked the vines by ourselves the first couple years and it about killed us.”

The winery broke even its third year and started turning a profit in the seventh year.

In the process Driggers has learned it’s best to “celebrate” the capriciousness of Mother Nature.

“Oregon has some pretty variable vintages; upstarts are always at risk,” Driggers said. “September of 2013 a typhoon came through here and dumped 7 inches of rain in a week-and-a-half.”

Back at the winery, Driggers says the key to exceptional wine lies in its barreling.

“It’s a nuance; like adding a spice, and I think that’s where winemakers get to use their genius,” he said. “I learned from some key people over the years and it has become one of my specialties.”

The varieties aged in oak are put in barrels whose insides have been charred to a certain “toast level.” The residual charcoal mellows out the wood so the wine “doesn’t taste like wood” and makes for buttery, sweeter wines more like their French counterparts.

“…But that effect lasts only a year, two at the most,” Driggers said. “If you want that flavor; that spice, you have to use new barrels every year and figure out what you want to use for each wine.

“We’re getting a good reputation for that,” he added. “We won a gold ribbon at the Oregon State Fair in 2007 for our Pinot gris and every year after that have not been able to make enough.

“I’ve almost stopped doing the competitions anymore with the increasing wine tourism,” Driggers said. “People from all over the country come to this area already knowing which wineries they’re going to visit.”

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LIVE brings added dimension to wine http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/live-brings-added-dimension-to-wine http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/live-brings-added-dimension-to-wine#Comments Thu, 8 Sep 2016 10:16:37 -0400 Margarett Waterbury http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160909886 There’s a lot going on at Ayres Vineyard. There are the grapes, of course: 18.5 acres of them, mostly Pinot noir, spilling down a grassy slope overlooking the peaks of the Coast Range. And then there’s the cellar, a purpose-built winemaking facility directly adjacent to the vineyard.

But this high, south-facing saddle in the Ribbon Ridge AVA just outside Newberg, Ore., is home to more than just a business. It’s also where winemaker Brad McLeroy and his extended family live — kids, dogs, even in-laws, all making a home among the vines.

Their business marks the culmination of a long career in wine, which took McLeroy from his family’s wine shop in Kansas City all the way to the Willamette Valley.

“I came ... in the early ’90s, and I loved it. I thought to myself, ‘Oh my gosh, people live this way?’ So in 1993 I moved to Portland, went to culinary school, and started working at wineries. And my fate was sealed.”

Ribbon Ridge AVA is the smallest of the Willamette Valley AVAs, and one McLeroy says is characterized by drier, warmer conditions and a persistent breeze that keeps mildew pressure down and minimizes frost in the early season. “Daytime temps are a little warmer, so we ripen a little earlier. Some years the faucet comes on in the fall, and it’s nice to get ripened before then.”

Those conditions, coupled with sandy, clay- and fossil-studded soil, produce a darker expression of Pinot noir characterized by dark fruit, earth, and baking spice components.

All of Ayres’ grapes are used in their estate wines. With the exception of a small “fun whites” block, the acreage is planted entirely with five different clones of Pinot noir: Dijon clones 3, 115, 667, 777, and Pommard. With the vineyard abutting the home where McLeroy and his family live, chemical use is kept to a bare minimum. “We don’t use pesticides or herbicides; this is where my kids and dogs play,” says McLeroy.

Ayres is certified by LIVE, an independent certification board that promotes winegrowing and winemaking practices that tread lightly on the environment, protect wildlife, and treat workers fairly. Originating in the Willamette Valley in 1996, LIVE relies on science-based standards for viticulture as well as enology, making it one of the only third-party certification program that encompasses the vineyard as well as the cellar.

To maintain his certification, McLeroy must keep a log of everything he applies to the vineyard, host an annual inspection, document any soil amendments, and adhere to a set of industry best practices for human resources. “It might cost a little more to farm this way, but I think it’s worth it,” McLeroy says.

McLeroy has seen his fair share of change in the Willamette Valley wine community over the past 15 years. “There are some rumblings right now of bigger entities moving in, but you can’t fight change. I’m not going to say the party’s full.”

But McLeroy isn’t too concerned about the competition, at least not in an immediate sense. “Family is first and foremost for us. We’re just going to keep our heads down and sell the next vintage.”

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Winery features unique Albariño grapes http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/winery-features-unique-albarixf1o-grapes http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/winery-features-unique-albarixf1o-grapes#Comments Thu, 8 Sep 2016 10:16:33 -0400 Margarett Waterbury http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160909887 Tad Seestedt, founder of Ransom Wine and Spirits, has been working in the Willamette Valley wine industry for more than 20 years. Yet until a few years ago, he didn’t have a vineyard to call his own.

“When I first got here,” says Seestedt, “I was pretty naive. In upstate New York, I could buy land for five or 10 thousand dollars an acre. I thought it would be the same here. And then I got slapped with reality.”

Today, Ransom Wine and Spirits sits on a 40-acre parcel between Sheridan and Willamina, just before the foothills of the Coast Range. Ransom is the only winery in Oregon that also operates a full distillery, where Seestedt and his team make whiskey, vodka, grappa, vermouth and two kinds of gin.

The property where Ransom is currently located was purchased in 2008. Between 2010 and 2012, Seestedt planted 1.2 acres of Albariño grapes on the site, and the first harvest took place in 2015.

Although Seestedt has been making and selling wine under the Ransom label since 1999, and making wine professionally since 1993, these Albariño plantings are Ransom’s first estate fruit.

At first, Seestedt thought they were the first plantings of Albariño in the valley. Not until after the vines were in the ground did he discover that Myron Redford, Willamette Valley wine pioneer and longtime friend and mentor to Seestedt, had also planted Albariño grapes at Amity Vineyard in 2007.

Last year, Ransom and Amity joined forces to release a 100 percent Albariño wine made from grapes from both plantings.

Becoming a grape grower was the next chapter for Seestedt. “The transition has been really rewarding. It helps as a winemaker to be out in the vineyard. You have a much better grasp of what’s happening,” he explains.

While more plantings might be in Ransom’s future, Seestedt isn’t sure when that will happen. “I don’t want to rush. We’ll start getting an idea of how this acre performs, and then go from there.”

Although Pinot noir and Chardonnay command the best prices, as an estate winemaker, Seestedt is much more interested in exploring less popular varietals.

“Wine in modern Oregon hasn’t even scratched the surface as far as varietals are concerned,” says Seestedt. “It took the Europeans millennia to figure out what grew best where — we’re just getting started. Really our climate is not very similar to Germany or France. We have very low humidity in the summer. I think our climate is more like the Iberian Peninsula.”

When asked what other varietals spark his interest, Seestedt sticks with Spain. “If I could get my hands on some Basque varieties, I’d love to plant those. They’re hard to find in this country, though. I like the idea of being a suitcase renegade, but a lot of bad things have happened as a result of that attitude.”

Then, he sighs and looks out at his fields. “It was a long time coming for me to buy this piece of ground and put the vines in it — but I finally did it.”

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U.S. wine industry by the numbers http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/us-wine-industry-by-the-numbers http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Wine/20160908/us-wine-industry-by-the-numbers#Comments Thu, 8 Sep 2016 10:16:22 -0400 http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160909888 4.3 million: 2015 U.S. wine grape production, in tons.

3.7 million: 2015 California wine grape production, in tons.

2.6 million: 2007 California wine grape production, in tons.

560,000: 2015 number of bearing acres of wine grapes in California.

480,000: 2007 number of bearing acres of wine grapes in California.

65,000: 2015 Oregon wine grape production, in tons.

38,600: 2007 Oregon wine grape production, in tons.

19,000: 2015 number of bearing acres of wine grapes in Oregon.

13,800: 2007 number of bearing acres of wine grapes in Oregon.

2,752: 2015 Idaho wine grape production, in tons.

1,300: Number of bearing acres of wine grapes in Idaho.

51: Number of wineries in Idaho.

$169 million: Contribution of the Idaho wine industry to the state’s economy.

230,000: 2015 Washington wine grape production, in tons.

127,000: 2007 Washington wine grape production, in tons.

48,000: 2015 number of bearing acres of wine grapes in Washington.

30,500: 2007 number of bearing acres of wine grapes in Washington.

$55.8 billion: Retail value of all wine sold in the U.S.

$31.9 billion: Retail value of California wine sold in the U.S.

$1.61 billion: Value of all U.S. wine exported.

51.2 million: Number of cases of U.S. wine exported.

$622 million: Value of U.S. wine exported to European Union.

$23 million: Value of U.S. wine exported to South Korea.

21 percent: Percentage of wine consumed in U.S. that was Chardonnay, by volume.

14 percent: Percentage of wine consumed in U.S. that was Cabernet Sauvignon, by volume.

9 percent: Percentage of wine consumed in U.S. that was Pinot gris, by volume.

8 percent: Percentage of wine consumed in U.S. that was Merlot, by volume.

5.5 percent: Percentage of wine consumed in U.S. that was Pinot noir, by volume.

5 percent: Percentage of wine consumed in U.S. that was Moscato or Sauvignon blanc, by volume.

4 percent: Percentage of wine consumed in U.S. that was White Zinfandel, by volume.

229 million: Amount of California wine sold in the U.S., in cases.

Sources: NASS, Wine Institute, Idaho Wine Commission

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Signs urge drivers to keep it safe around farm machinery http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Safety/20160901/signs-urge-drivers-to-keep-it-safe-around-farm-machinery http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Safety/20160901/signs-urge-drivers-to-keep-it-safe-around-farm-machinery#Comments Thu, 1 Sep 2016 10:21:34 -0400 Janae Sargent http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160909975 Oregon Aglink and Papé Machinery distributed 200 signs along rural Marion County, Ore., roads in June to promote the awareness of farm equipment and safe driving.

The signs are posted along roads in agricultural areas and encourage drivers to watch for farm equipment.

Geoff Horning, Oregon Aglink executive director, said he hopes to expand the signs into other counties across Oregon in 2016-2017.

“Statistically, there are a lot of road-based accidents with the general public getting impatient,” Horning said. “We wanted to create some awareness.”

Horning said the conversation about road safety and farm equipment started with farmers who expressed that driving on some rural roads was dangerous because drivers in cars illegally pass tractors and other farm equipment.

Papé Machinery partnered with Oregon Aglink to cover the costs of creating and distributing the signs.

The distribution of safe-driving signs is one of several safety measures Oregon Aglink is sponsoring this year.

The organization sponsored online videos in cooperation with SAIF Corp. to educate farmers on shop safety, tractor safety and all-terrain vehicle safety.

Horning said Oregon Aglink will be distributing the shop safety video to its membership during the first week of September as a part of national agricultural safety week.

“We take safety very seriously,” Horning said. “We have a strong relationship with SAIF Corp. We want to educate people to help them slow down and not be in such a hurry because most accidents can be avoided.”

Oregon Aglink, formerly known as the Agri-Business Council of Oregon, is a private, nonprofit volunteer membership organization dedicated to growing Oregon agriculture through education and promotion. The organization also seeks to bridge the gap between urban and rural Oregonians.

Papé Machinery sells and services new and used agricultural and construction machinery through 21 locations in Oregon, Washington, California and Nevada.

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SAIF broadens scope of ag safety seminars http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Safety/20160901/saif-broadens-scope-of-ag-safety-seminars http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Safety/20160901/saif-broadens-scope-of-ag-safety-seminars#Comments Thu, 1 Sep 2016 10:21:04 -0400 Janae Sargent http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160909976 SAIF Corp. is adding health and well-being to the curriculum for its 21st annual agricultural safety seminars.

Between November and March, SAIF will host 28 free seminars in 16 cities. The seminars will cover agricultural safety topics ranging from equipment operation to drugs and alcohol to training procedures.

Senior safety management consultant Kevin Pfau said skin cancer risks and precautions will be the focus of his health topic.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, Oregon has the fifth-highest melanoma incidence rate in the U.S., and all of those incidences are diagnosed in non-Hispanic whites.

“We all know the extreme farmer’s tans people get out on the farms but the truth is most people aren’t protecting themselves,” said Pfau. “I’m going to be encouraging them to work with dermatologists and protect themselves.”

Mike Watters, corporate communication and design manager, said SAIF picks the topics for the annual series based on the biggest safety concerns of the agriculture industry each year.

The health and safety portion of the seminars will be included in the “hot topics” seminar, which will be presented by Pfau.

SAIF has not finalized all of the topics for the seminars but Pfau said training seasonal employees and leadership safety will be two additional focuses.

The safety seminars build on condensed information available on the SAIF agriculture safety website and meet one requirement for farmers to be exempt from random OSHA inspections, which Watters said is a big draw for attendees.

In 2015, the seminars attracted 2,200 attendees, up from 1,559 attendees in 2005. Pfau said seminar attendance has been growing with the growth of the agriculture industry.

To meet the growing needs of the agriculture industry, SAIF will also offer nine sessions in Spanish. Last year, the Spanish sessions drew 678 attendees.

The sessions are four hours long, with two hours in the morning, a free lunch and two hours in the afternoon. Registration is free and will open on the SAIF website later this month.

Online

SAIF: http://www.saif.com/

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How to protect yourself from the sun’s rays http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Safety/20160901/how-to-protect-yourself-from-the-suns-rays http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Safety/20160901/how-to-protect-yourself-from-the-suns-rays#Comments Thu, 1 Sep 2016 10:18:55 -0400 Centers for Disease Control http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160909978 The sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays can damage your skin in as little as 15 minutes. Follow these recommendations to help protect yourself.

You can reduce your risk of skin damage and skin cancer by seeking shade under an umbrella, tree, or other shelter before you need relief from the sun. Your best bet to protect your skin is to use sunscreen or wear protective clothing when you’re outside — even when you’re in the shade.

When possible, long-sleeved shirts and long pants and skirts can provide protection from UV rays. Clothes made from tightly woven fabric offer the best protection. A wet T-shirt offers much less UV protection than a dry one, and darker colors may offer more protection than lighter colors. Some clothing certified under international standards comes with information on its ultraviolet protection factor.

If wearing this type of clothing isn’t practical, at least try to wear a T-shirt. Keep in mind that a typical T-shirt has an SPF rating lower than 15, so use other types of protection as well.

For the most protection, wear a hat with a brim all the way around that shades your face, ears, and the back of your neck. A tightly woven fabric, such as canvas, works best to protect your skin from UV rays. Avoid straw hats with holes that let sunlight through. A darker hat may offer more UV protection.

If you wear a baseball cap, you should also protect your ears and the back of your neck by wearing clothing that covers those areas, using sunscreen with at least SPF 15, or by staying in the shade.

Sunglasses protect your eyes from UV rays and reduce the risk of cataracts. They also protect the tender skin around your eyes from sun exposure.

Sunglasses that block both UVA and UVB rays offer the best protection. Most sunglasses sold in the United States, regardless of cost, meet this standard. Wrap-around sunglasses work best because they block UV rays from sneaking in from the side.

Put on a broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15 before you go outside, even on slightly cloudy or cool days. Don’t forget to put a thick layer on all parts of exposed skin. Get help for hard-to-reach places like your back. And remember, sunscreen works best when combined with other options to prevent UV damage.

Most sun protection products work by absorbing, reflecting, or scattering sunlight. They contain chemicals that interact with the skin to protect it from UV rays. All products do not have the same ingredients; if your skin reacts badly to one product, try another one or call a doctor.

SPF. Sunscreens are assigned a sun protection factor number — known by the initials SPF — that rates their effectiveness in blocking UV rays. Higher numbers indicate more protection. You should use a broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15.

Sunscreen wears off. Put it on again if you stay out in the sun for more than two hours and after swimming, sweating, or toweling off.

Check the sunscreen’s expiration date. Sunscreen without an expiration date has a shelf life of no more than three years, but its shelf life is shorter if it has been exposed to high temperatures.

Some makeup and lip balms contain some of the same chemicals used in sunscreens. If they do not have at least SPF 15, don’t use them by themselves.

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Tips for staying safe on your ATV http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Safety/20160901/tips-for-staying-safe-on-your-atv http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Safety/20160901/tips-for-staying-safe-on-your-atv#Comments Thu, 1 Sep 2016 10:19:24 -0400 Show-Me Farm Safety http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160909977 A helmet is the single most important piece of protective equipment when riding an ATV. There are many different options when it comes to selecting a helmet for riding ATVs.

Full-face helmets offer the most protection, guarding the face and the head. Open-faced helmets are lighter to wear, but should always be worn with a chin guard to protect the chin and mouth. Both types of helmets should fit snugly and be securely fastened when riding the ATV.

Eye protection is very important when riding ATVs. Getting hit with an object like a branch, rock, or bug while driving can cause severe injury and possible blindness.

Wearing a helmet with a face shield or riding goggles will protect your eyes while riding ATVs. If you choose to wear goggles, be sure they are well-ventilated, securely fastened and free from scratches to prevent distraction.

Driving ATVs for extended periods of time can make your hands sore and tired. Wear gloves that offer protection and comfort while driving. Gloves help protect your hands from abrasions when riding or during an accident.

It is important to wear a long-sleeved shirt and long pants when riding to prevent cuts and scrapes on the body. Exposed skin can be severely damaged if hit with branches or rocks.

Operating an ATV is only successful if you control the vehicle at all times. Riders should be able to start and stop the ATV as quickly as possible to avoid accidents.

It is important to wear shoes that prevent your feet from slipping off the footrests when riding. Boots that lace up and are at least above the ankle for support are encouraged.

An ATV is a piece of equipment, and should be checked and maintained frequently to ensure peak operational function. Inspecting the ATV before each use will minimize the risk of injury. The following parts should be checked before operating your ATV:

• Tires: Always maintain the recommended tire pressure in each tire. Use a low pressure gauge to check the pressure; most automobile tire gauges do not accurately measure low pressure in ATV tires.

• Throttle: Check the throttle operation while moving the handlebars fully to the left and right.

• Brakes: Brakes can prevent an ATV accident in a matter of seconds. They are one of the most important parts on an ATV and should be kept in prime condition.

• Lights: When riding at night or on roads, lights are needed to alert others that you are on an ATV. Make sure all lights are properly connected and all bulbs are working before riding.

• Fuel and oil: Running out of oil or fuel when riding ATVs is a hassle. Before riding, check to make sure you have enough oil and fuel to last for the duration of your trip and check that you do not have fuel or oil leaks.

• Drivetrain and chassis: Riding on rough terrain will loosen chassis parts. Check each part to ensure all are tightly secured, including handlebars, and footrests, and adjust with fasteners with a wrench if necessary.

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Newlyweds start cider apple nursery http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Nursery/20160831/newlyweds-start-cider-apple-nursery http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Nursery/20160831/newlyweds-start-cider-apple-nursery#Comments Wed, 31 Aug 2016 17:02:35 -0400 Janae Sargent http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160839955 While many couples spend their honeymoons on the beach or in a hotel, newlyweds Phillip and Kristin Haworth spent their honeymoon searching for graftwood for their cider apple nursery, Cider Babies.

The Haworths started Cider Babies in 2014, a few months before they got married. The operation started with 1,000 trees in their backyard and has grown to 7,500 on a separate property with plans to expand further.

Graftwood is from a tree that is collected and added to a host tree that has already been planted. When it is grafted onto the host tree, the two species grow together to make a single plant.

Cider babies is a bare-root cider apple tree nursery outside Salem, Ore. They sell specialty cider apple trees to individuals and businesses that grow their own apples.

Phillip Haworth grew up on his father’s nursery outside Gaston, Ore. After going to college and spending most of his life in a day job, he started thinking about something he could do with Kristin that would get him out from behind a desk.

He read an article about cider apples that said the biggest limitation on the cider industry was the lack of cider-specific apples.

“I just thought ‘Hey, I can do that.’ And we went for it,” he said.

Kristin explained that cider apples aren’t a product people would eat. They have a lot of quirky qualities and produce only every two to three years, so they are unattractive to many big nurseries and orchards.

Phillip said the biggest interest he has seen in their trees is from individuals who have day jobs and are interested in being a part of the industry out of their love for it.

The Haworths mainly sell to regional cideries but have also sold trees to customers in Iowa, Michigan and Colorado.

“I call us a boutique nursery because we’re small and our product is a little bit expensive,” she said. “But it’s just a different way of growing.”

Kristin, who had no experience in nurseries, said she is just happy to spend time with Phillip learning about the trees.

Kristin and Phillip still work full-time jobs away from the nursery so they spend most of their nights and weekends on their property working.

Haworth said he hasn’t thought far enough ahead to think about how much he wants the nursery to grow, and is enjoying being a part of the industry.

The couple still lives in Salem and commutes to their nursery but plans to move into the house on the property so they won’t have to drive back and forth so much.

“We wanted to build something together, being newly married,” she said. “We do this because we love it.”

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J. Frank Schmidt & Son celebrates 70th anniversary http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Nursery/20160818/j-frank-schmidt-amp-son-celebrates-70th-anniversary http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Nursery/20160818/j-frank-schmidt-amp-son-celebrates-70th-anniversary#Comments Thu, 18 Aug 2016 17:48:52 -0400 Janae Sargent http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160819840 J. Frank Schmidt & Son Co. celebrates its 70th anniversary this year — and the 50th anniversary of its introduction of the Redpoint Maple tree.

The 2,500-acre wholesale nursery in Boring, Ore., sells more than 500 varieties of trees and has become one of the nation’s largest wholesale nurseries and has one of the leading tree introduction programs.

Even with such a large operation, Nancy Buley, the nursery’s communications director, said a high standard of respect for employees and treatment remains a cornerstone of the company’s success.

Buley considers herself a “tree journalist,” and has been with Schmidt for 26 years — making her one of many employees who have made the nursery a home.

She handles marketing and communications outreach with Jeff Lafrenz, the marketing manager. Both found their way to J. Frank Schmidt unexpectedly and stayed for the supportive environment.

Lafrenz, who has been with the company 30 years, said the creative freedom he has is as close as it gets to being self-employed but with a lot of support from the company.

The company is owned and operated by J. Frank Schmidt III, a third-generation nurseryman. His father, J. Frank Schmidt Jr., started the company in 1946 after growing up on his father’s nursery.

J. Frank Schmidt Jr. saw a need for trees of consistent quality, form and survivability and began cloning and introducing new trees. The nursery has introduced more than 70 trademarked cultivars.

The nursery’s best-known tree, the Redpoint Maple, took 17 years to develop.

Thirty years ago, Schmidt also started selecting trees for heat and drought tolerance.

“Developing trees is a long process that takes a lot of patience, dedication and vision,” Buley said. “Frank Jr. had a lot of vision for the future.”

To clone and introduce a new tree, up to 2,000 seedlings are planted and the best ones are grown out for several years. They are then sent to evaluation trials in various regions around the United States.

Introducing and growing trees has become such a large operation that production had to be split among five smaller farms across the property.

In the first stage of the growing process, cuttings are made to reproduce trees at High Forest Farms, what Buley calls the “nursery of the nursery.”

Manager Celina Villaseñor said her team makes more than 30,000 cuttings per day at the farm.

Eva Alvarez has been on the cutting team for 18 years. Her husband and son also work at Schmidt.

Buley said she thinks employees stay at Schmidt for so long because of how well they are treated and the close-knit community.

For example, every Wednesday after work, employees gather at the company’s 3-acre garden to take whatever food they want home for themselves and their family.

Schmidt employs 70 full-time employees plus seasonal employees. Buley said labor has become a concern at the nursery because it keeps having to raise its wages above minimum wage to stay competitive with other nurseries to get good help.

Buley said another labor concern is replacing retiring employees with a younger workforce.

Schmidt is well into training the next generation to take over the nursery. Frank III’s nephew, Sam Barkley, is expected to take over the company and has been working in various parts of the nursery for eight years.

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Alpha Nursery treats employees like family http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Nursery/20160818/alpha-nursery-treats-employees-like-family http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Nursery/20160818/alpha-nursery-treats-employees-like-family#Comments Thu, 18 Aug 2016 17:41:14 -0400 Janae Sargent http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160819851 Doug Zeilinski, owner of Alpha Nursery, credits his employees with the growth and success of his business.

Alpha Nursery is a family-owned container nursery that sells more than 750 varieties of plants across the U.S.

Started in 1978 by Zeilinski, a 23-year-old Oregon State University college graduate, it has grown from 3 acres to 150 and bases its success on innovation, diversification and employee empowerment.

One of those employees is RJ Tancredi, general manager, who has been at the nursery 36 years, since the nursery was started. He remembers walking through the original property with Zeilinski and imagining the future.

“I grew up with this program, a lot of us did,” said Tancredi. “This was my first job and will probably be my last.”

Tancredi is the longest-tenured employee at Alpha Nursery but not the only one that has made Alpha a career. Zeilinski said at least two dozen of his 50 employees have been at Alpha for at least 15 years.

When employees reach the 15-year mark, Zeilinski gives them a gold Alpha Nursery watch as a way to commemorate their place at the company.

Employee value and empowerment is a cornerstone that is honored far before employees reach their 15-year mark.

Alpha Nursery maintains a full-time staff of 38 crew workers and 12 staff. Every employee at Alpha has received health insurance, vacation and sick pay for the last 15 years. Zeilinski and the other managers conduct reviews and report cards for each employee to determine bonuses and raises, honor outstanding employees with plaques, hold regular barbecues and parties and even let employees name the equipment they work with.

“If we didn’t have them, we wouldn’t have this,” Zeilinski said.

Family is another pinnacle of the growth of the nursery; Tancredi said he ended up being “Uncle RJ” to Zeilinski’s two sons, Scott and Josh.

Scott Zeilinski now manages the Zeilinski farm in Keizer, Ore., and Josh works at the nursery in nearby Salem.

Zeilinski originally grew up on the farm with his dad, Ernie. He said having the farm has allowed the nursery to take more risks and has helped offset times when the nursery didn’t bring in as much money as other years.

Josh said he remembers working with the irrigation crew when he was 6 for 75 cents an hour to save up to buy Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle action figures at K-Mart.

After graduating from Pepperdine University and working at a large California nursery, Josh returned to Alpha to get back to the way a family nursery operates.

“It’s more fun working at a place like this,” he said. “We have a lot less employees so we get to know everyone personally.”

Doug Zeilinski said Josh is always out working with the grounds crew to get to know them and to get out of his office.

Tancredi joked that when he dies, his wife will have to sprinkle his ashes at the nursery because he’s put so much of his heart into it.

“I’m not a religious person but I have a lot of faith and this nursery is about as close to church it can get,” Tancredi said.

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Online system helps ‘consortium nursery’ thrive http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Nursery/20160818/online-system-helps-consortium-nursery-thrive http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Nursery/20160818/online-system-helps-consortium-nursery-thrive#Comments Thu, 18 Aug 2016 17:48:12 -0400 Janae Sargent http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160819842 Paul Bizon came across the idea of a “consortium nursery,” at which several growers share space and materials, while he was traveling in Germany in 2003.

When he returned to the United States, he partnered with the owners of Oregon Turf and Tree and started Garden World, a highly automated retail nursery that sells growers’ plants through an online management system.

PlantX, the operating system, links the inventory directly to the website so when someone buys a plant, it is taken off the website and the grower of that specific plant is notified.

Bizon also owns Bizon Nursery, a wholesale nursery that is known for its conifers and Japanese maples.

As a grower, he said he saw the potential and need for a system that would link growers and sell their materials together.

Instead of buying grower material upfront, growers bring their products to Garden World and get paid every seven days online for whatever they sell.

“It’s a place for growers to bring material and it’s kind of a balancing act of not letting growers build the nursery up, not selling too much and giving enough material to keep the inventory fresh,” Bizon said.

Located on the side of Interstate 5 just outside Woodburn, Ore., Garden World is the easiest nursery to see and the hardest nursery to find, Zach Peyton, the manager, said.

Because of its location — it’s not on an exit for the interstate — Peyton said the nursery is reliant on its online system to sell product.

When plants come in from individual growers, they are tagged with the grower’s information, which is immediately uploaded to the website. All of the employees and growers have access to the website on their phones so they can see how inventory is moving.

“A lot of people are saying the website made it so easy and that’s why they’re here,” said Peyton.

Bizon said the Willamette Valley is the perfect place for a nursery like Garden World because the growers are all so close they can easily monitor and control their sales.

Wayne Carstensen, a contractor, developed PlantX after Bizon came to him with the idea.

“No software system is out there that is more sophisticated or easy to use,” Bizon said. “There’s nothing like it in the nation.”

In addition to the website, Garden World’s operations are mostly automated. There are five employees at the 10-acre nursery and Peyton said most of the operations can run off of the app.

Before the housing market crash of 2008, Garden World had 15 employees. Peyton said the crash cut Garden World sales nearly in half. To cope, the nursery reduced its staff and stopped selling small plants and vegetables that required a lot of hand labor.

Peyton said landscapers, designers and homeowners drive the market at Garden World. The nursery delivers locally so a lot of sales come from nearby Portland, where people shop online and have their plants delivered to their house.

Carstenson started selling PlantX to growers across the United States as an online operating and management system after he developed it for Garden World.

“The success of the system has really fascinated me,” Bizon said. “Out of this little Garden World company grew this software company that is being used by people throughout the nation.”

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Fessler Nursery branches out http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Nursery/20160818/fessler-nursery-branches-out http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Nursery/20160818/fessler-nursery-branches-out#Comments Thu, 18 Aug 2016 17:48:25 -0400 Brenna Wiegand http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160819841 The modest azalea nursery Ken and Marie Fessler started on their Woodburn, Ore., farm in 1960 has grown to over 500,000 square feet of greenhouse space with 35-45 employees.

Though the azaleas upon which Fessler Nursery was founded will be cut from production this year, lush fuchsia plants and baskets are still a mainstay at the second-generation business. Some 20,000 fuchsia baskets leave the gates each year.

Ken and Marie’s sons Dale and Marvin run the nursery; sister Debbie Farrell heads propagation and Katy Fessler manages seasonal retail and special projects.

Though “retired,” Ken is there nearly every day planting, pruning or irrigating.

The linchpin of the nursery’s staying power is its diversification and mastery of four distinct markets — hanging baskets, bedding plants, houseplants and propagation.

In addition to their own vegetative cuttings, the nursery receives up to 100,000 cuttings in a day from Selecta One, a subsidiary of Ball Horticultural Co. and a world leader in breeding, producing and marketing vegetatively propagated ornamental plants. The cuttings come from all over the world.

“We stick over 3 million cuttings,” Katy Fessler said. “It’s hard to say how many plants and baskets we sell; Marv estimates around 700,000 4-inch pots and about 80,000 baskets a year.”

Like the hanging baskets, Fessler poinsettias are popular material for community fund-raisers and the nursery has become a wide area’s go-to place for plant sale fund-raisers, whether Mother’s Day hanging baskets or the Christmas poinsettias.

Last year the nursery added a new section of greenhouses dedicated to the spring fund-raiser baskets.

Poinsettias join the vast array of tropical plants the Fesslers propagate and grow in more than 30 greenhouses. The houseplants are shipped all over the Western United States.

April through June Fessler Nursery opens its doors to the public, where a brisk retail trade includes a crush for Mother’s Day baskets.

“Since we are the grower and reseller, we can charge less and sell in mass quantities,” Katy Fessler said. “It’s a Costco model: low margin, high quality, low price, self-service for the most part and a high volume of product. Where else can you go and find 10 full beds of geraniums?”

Retail season ended June 30 and with the premises clear staff is redoubling their improvement efforts, starting with replacing old greenhouse siding and roofing with more energy-efficient materials.

The nursery continues its five-year exploration and increasing use of beneficial soil microbes and predatory insects toward cleaner and more specific pest control.

“Our baskets are on drip and fertilizer injectors,” Katy Fessler said. “A new flat-filler sticking line improved efficiency in our cutting division and a programmable watering boom lets us custom water our cutting beds.

“Though managing labor, keeping up and putting up with government-mandated regulations and finding the family-work balance is a continual challenge,” Katy Fessler said, “But we love being able to provide a product people really enjoy. We also like being able to stay close to home — there’s no commute!”

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Nursery thrives despite remote location http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Nursery/20160818/nursery-thrives-despite-remote-location http://www.capitalpress.com/SpecialSections/Nursery/20160818/nursery-thrives-despite-remote-location#Comments Thu, 18 Aug 2016 17:47:57 -0400 Brenna Wiegand http://www.capitalpress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016160819843 Marlene Godfrey started Godfrey Nursery in 1981 with little more than a 50-foot greenhouse.

Located outside the small town of Aumsville in Oregon’s Willamette Valley, the nursery is now owned by Godfrey’s daughter, Jennifer, and her husband, Darren Schad. It operates on about 3 acres, with an expansion underway.

Godfrey Nursery produces annuals, perennials, vegetables, hanging baskets and containers, shrubs, trees and a full selection of hard goods including a gift shop and yard art by local crafters.

“We’re kind of unique in what we do here,” Darren said. “We’re like a wholesale nursery for retail; we grow almost everything ourselves. We’re propagating every other week from December to March, averaging 35,000 cuttings at a time.”

Their biggest trade is in hanging baskets. They produce more than 20,000 baskets annually from the thousands of flats of annual flowers they put out every year. The number goes up every year.

Also on the rise is the call for vegetable starts.

“The demand is crazy for vegetables now; a lot of people have their own little greenhouses,” Darren said. “The biggest pick-up has been among the younger people.”

The nursery is open daily March through September. In response to repeated customer requests, this year for the first time it will be open during the holidays. During the three weekends following Thanksgiving, they’ll sell greenery baskets, containers and other gift items.

“That’s kind of how we’ve driven the nursery for the past 30 years, people asking if we’ll do things,” Darren said. “It’s risky; you don’t want to go too crazy.”

They employ some social media for promotions but the bulk of their clientele comes through word-of-mouth.

Watching over the decades, a pattern has become evident: Regular customers being showing up as soon as the nursery opens for the season, peaking around May 1. June then brings an annual flood of new customers who’ve just heard about the place from those other customers.

“Mom passed away from Alzheimer’s last spring,” Jennifer said. “Sadly, this prevented her from enjoying the growth of the nursery through the past years.”

Since assuming ownership in 1997, Jennifer and Darren have learned who’s really in charge.

“Without a doubt, Mother Nature drives the bus,” Darren said. “When the weather’s good, sales are good. You’ve got to watch for severe cold, too. I do a lot of staying up at night to watch the greenhouses. Though we try to stay preventative there are always things like heaters that decide they don’t want to work.”

While their location off the beaten path has prevented even some locals from discovering Godfrey Nursery, it doesn’t deter visitors from as far away as Seattle, Idaho and Central Oregon, including landscapers, independent garden center owners and municipalities.

“They’ll bring a big trailer or truck and start filling it,” Darren said. “Some make monthly trips.”

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