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Home  »  Opinion

Growers look at new pear

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Dan Wheat
Brandt Tree Fruits in Yakima, Wash., is testing a new pear that looks like an apple. Called a Papple, its popularity is growing.

YAKIMA, Wash. — A new pear that resembles an apple is being tested in a orchard near Yakima and shared with potential growers in Washington, Oregon, California, Missouri and Canada.

The Papple, a trademark name, is a hybrid of Chinese and Japanese pears that has been grown in New Zealand and sold in England, according to Lynnell Brandt, president of Brandt’s Fruit Trees, the Associated International Group of Nurseries and Proprietary Variety Management, all in Yakima.

This is the second season the fruit has been sold in England and it also has been sold in Singapore, Hong Kong, Canada and the United States with great results, Brandt said.

AIGN is the exclusive global licensor of the Papple which has a mild sweet, low acid flavor, crisp juicy texture and a bright red-orange blush covering a lemon-colored background, he said.

Papple is being evaluated on 5-year-old trees in a Brandt Fruit Trees orchard near Yakima. Samples from those trees are being distributed to a select group of potential growers by Brandt’s son, Kevin, who is vice president of Proprietary Variety Management. The company was formed in 2012 to assist in commercialization of new tree fruits.

Papple has good yields of large spherical fruit, is leaf scab resistant, stores well and has received good review in England, the Brandts said.

They announced last spring that AIGN had signed an agreement for use of the Papple trademark with Worldwide Fruit, an international fruit marketing and distribution company specializing in apple and pear supply to major United Kingdom retailers.

Worldwide Fruit plans to have 15,000 Papple trees planted in the UK by the end of the winter of 2015, they said.



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