Scio FFA members help Expo, which in turn helps them

The Expo gets the energy of the FFA members, and they are rewarded with money for their club savings accounts.

By Geoff Parks

For the Capital Press

Published on November 2, 2017 8:59AM

Kyndal Porter, treasurer of the Scio FFA chapter, and Dallyss Vanderyacht, reporter, will be working with the chapter’s other FFA members at the Willamette Valley Ag Expo.

Geoff Parks/For the Capital Press

Kyndal Porter, treasurer of the Scio FFA chapter, and Dallyss Vanderyacht, reporter, will be working with the chapter’s other FFA members at the Willamette Valley Ag Expo.

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For 17 years, the Scio FFA chapter’s relationship with the Willamette Valley Ag Expo has flourished as the two organizations successfully reached their yearly goals.

The Expo gets the energy and dedication of the FFA members, and they are rewarded with money to be divided among the workers for their club savings accounts.

The duties of the two co-chairs of this year’s chapter Expo efforts — Kyndal Porter, FFA treasurer, and Dallyss Vanderyacht, FFA reporter — center on organization and scheduling issues.

“Together we plan the volunteers’ Expo schedules and coordinate the duties of those who sign up for specific jobs and tell them what they need to do,” Vanderyacht, 17, said. At the WVAE’s featured Dine Around Oregon dinner, FFA members are runners, take tickets, serve and clean up after the meal and act as greeters.

With the money made from the Expo and other fund-raising events throughout the year, the students hopefully earn enough money to attend the annual state and national FFA conventions.

Porter, 17, said at the end of the marathon event the sponsoring Willamette Valley Ag Association “writes a check to us — which last year was about $1,000 — for the students’ hard work.”

It is disbursed to each student’s account, based on how many hours they worked, she said.

Krysta Sprague, the Scio FFA chapter’s adviser, said it costs “anywhere from $100 to $150 per student to attend the state convention in the spring and more like $1,000 each for the national convention in the fall.”

In addition to funding travel and expenses for the two conventions, Scio FFA students earn money throughout the year from barbecues, animal sales, auctions, a “pass the pig” event and other fundraisers to purchase jackets, scarves, ties, pay membership fees and other items and expenses.

Also, Vanderyacht said some of last year’s Expo money was spent on marketing and promotions for the chapter.

“I think working for the Expo each year is an excellent opportunity for our kids,” Sprague said, adding that there were 15 to 20 Scio FFA chapter members signed up to work at the Expo this year.



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