Michael Bloomberg gives $1.5M to oppose ban on grocery tax

As New York City mayor, Bloomberg unsuccessfully tried to ban super-sized sodas.

Published on October 29, 2018 2:30PM

Michael Bloomberg, the UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Climate Action, speaks during the plenary session of the Global Action Climate Summit in San Francisco. Bloomberg donated $1.5 million to the campaign against a ballot measure in Oregon that would ban any future taxes on grocery revenue and items sold in supermarkets. Bloomberg did not comment on his donation, which was disclosed Friday, Oct. 26. As New York City mayor, Bloomberg unsuccessfully tried to ban super-sized sodas and has supported proposed soda taxes in other cities.

Eric Risberg/Associated Press

Michael Bloomberg, the UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Climate Action, speaks during the plenary session of the Global Action Climate Summit in San Francisco. Bloomberg donated $1.5 million to the campaign against a ballot measure in Oregon that would ban any future taxes on grocery revenue and items sold in supermarkets. Bloomberg did not comment on his donation, which was disclosed Friday, Oct. 26. As New York City mayor, Bloomberg unsuccessfully tried to ban super-sized sodas and has supported proposed soda taxes in other cities.

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PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has donated $1.5 million to the campaign against a ballot measure in Oregon that would ban any future taxes on grocery revenue and items sold in supermarkets.

The Oregonian/OregonLive said Monday that Bloomberg has not commented publicly on his donation, which was disclosed Friday. The donation was first reported by Portland’s weekly newspaper, Willamette Week.

As New York City mayor, Bloomberg unsuccessfully tried to ban super-sized sodas.

He also spent $5 million in 2017 to support a proposed soda tax in Chicago.

Oregon’s measure proposes a state constitutional amendment to prohibit new taxes on grocers and most groceries, including food and soda.

Taxes would still be allowed on alcohol, marijuana and tobacco.



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